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Meyer The Hottest Name For 2012, But We Don’t Think He’ll Be Back So Soon

When a college football job comes open, Urban Meyer’s name is connected to it.  When an article is written about the top candidates for jobs in 2012, Meyer’s name is on that list.

Read the internet and or turn on television or radio sports coverage and you’ll hear that it’s just a matter of time before the ex-Florida coach is back on the sidelines.

And we at MrSEC.com continue to say Meyer’s return will come later rather than sooner.

SI.com has posted a series of videos that shine light onto Meyer’s personal life.  In this clip from “Inside the Private World of Urban Meyer,” you’ll see how Meyer’s decision to walk away from football — twice in a year — impacted his wife and children.  Hint: They weren’t sad about it.

The lure of coaching is great, to be sure.  And Meyer may recharge his batteries and grab the reins at Ohio State in just a few short months.  But we think it’s more likely he’ll follow in the footsteps of fellow well-known workaholic Jon Gruden.  Rather than jump right back into coaching, the ex-Super Bowl winner has remained a broadcaster with ESPN much longer than anyone anticipated.  Don’t be surprised if Meyer doesn’t do the same.

Watch “Behind the Resignation” and we think you’ll understand why we feel the way we do.

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Muschamp Explains Weis Hire. Again. And Again.

It’s mid-May and Will Muschamp is still having to answer questions about why he chose Charlie Weis — long of the NFL and briefly of Notre Dame — to run his offense at Florida.

“The track record speaks for itself,” the coach said last week in Tampa.  “From a play-calling standpoint, a developer of quarterbacks; Matt Cassel, Tom Brady, four Super Bowl rings and 16 years of NFL experience speaks for itself.”

Yes, it does.  Weis might not have succeeded as a head coach in South Bend, but he has succeeded at just about every stop as an offensive coordinator.  In addition, Muschamp says he and Weis share many beliefs when it comes to offensive attacks.

“Philosophically, he and I are on the same page with what we want to do.  We want to be balanced on offense.  You have to be able to run the football to win games in our league consistently.  You can’t be a one-dimensional team in our league and survive the season.”

It’s interesting that of Muschamp’s two ex-NFL coordinator hires, Weis is getting more scrutiny than less-heralded D-coordinator Dan Quinn.  That wouldn’t have anything to do with the surly demeanor Weis often displays with reporters would it?

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Kentucky Lands Quarterback For 2012 Class

Kentucky has received a commitment from quarterback Patrick Towles from Highlands High School in Fort Thomas, Ky.

Towels chose Kentucky over offers from Vanderbilt, Louisville, Cincinnati and Illinois. He made his commitment to Kentucky after taking a visit to Lexington on Friday.

Towles has been taught at Highlands by a coach familiar to Kentucky fans – former Wildcat quarterback Jared Lorenzen.

“He was a great talent who played in the NFL, won a Super Bowl, and he’s been great for me,” Towles said. “He’s been supportive through this whole process. He didn’t put any pressure on me to go to UK, and he would have supported me if I went somewhere ese. But when I called him and told him I had committed (to Kentucky), he was excited.”

Lorenzon played quarterback at Kentucky from 2000-2003. He played in the NFL with the New York Giants from 2006-2007.

Towles is the third commitment for Kentucky’s class of 2012.

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Newton Wants Favre To Act As Mentor

Cam Newton is interested in mentoring under former (?) NFL quarterback Brett Favre.  Speaking last week at Super Bowl festivities, Newton told the NFL Network that Favre strongly influenced his decision to sign with agent Bus Cook.

“When Brett Favre came into the meeting room as I was trying to decide which agent I was going to select, I seen Brett and Brett’s calling me by my name, and I was like ‘Wow.’” 

Newton will hold his much-discussed media workout in California today.  As for his goal of mentoring under Favre, hopefully the ex-NFL’er (?) won’t advise him on how to pick up girls.

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SEC Headlines 2/5/2011

SEC Football

1.  The NCAA is investigating some of Ed Orgeron’s activities while at Tennessee. More here.

2. Will it be Auburn or Alabama? Cyrus Kouandjio will announce his decision on Monday.  A multimedia Cyrus timeline.

3. Even Pat Dye’s daughter is getting involved.

4. Sylvester Croom is no longer a coaching staff candidate at Alabama – Mike Groh is now the favorite.

5. UGA VIII, R.I.P.

6. The South Georgia Triangle - key to the Bulldogs recruiting class.

7. Jacoby Brissett picks Gators – mom isn’t happy.

8. Ole Miss assistant coaches will make about $2.5 million in 2011 – an increase of more than $400,000.

9. Gene Frenette on Urban Meyer’s new gig:  ”It’s nothing more than a high-profile coach being repaid after being a lap dog for ESPN during his time as Florida’s football coach.”

SEC Basketball

10. Who’s the most accurate three-point shooter in the SEC?  Right now, it’s Georgia’s Dustin Ware.

11. The Bulldogs open the second half of their SEC schedule today against Auburn.

12. Nick Marshall could be a two-sport athlete at Georgia.

13. It’s the first of three in a row at home for Vanderbilt -as the Commodores host South Carolina.  The last time these two teams met, the Gamecocks won in overtime.

14. Should Bruce Ellington play football, too?

15. Mississippi State will be without suspended senior guard Ravern Johnson as the Bulldogs travel to LSU today.

16. The Tigers start three freshmen and have lost five in a row.

17. Ole Miss tries to follow-up its victory at Kentucky with a win at Arkansas. The Rebels have won the last two years in Fayetteville.  Arkansas is offering free admission to students today.

18. Alabama is tough in the paint – not so much outside of it. The Tide try to make it five in a row today at Tennessee.

19. Bruce Pearl: “It’s going to be a very physical game.”

20. Scott Hopson won’t play for the Vols – out with a sprained ankle.

21. ESPN College Gameday comes to Gainesville for Kentucky vs. Florida.  The Wildcats know they need to play better on the road.

22. From AAU teammates to SEC foes, Kenny Boynton and Brandon Knight will be reunited on the court tonight. But they say it’s no big deal.

23.  Seth Davis says Gators by four.

24. Two future UK players will be on ESPN2 tonight.

25. Vanderbilt signee Kedron Johnson scored 55 points last night.

Extras

26. Ideas on Super Bowl prop bets.

27. Found.  Tape of Super Bowl I.

28. Who scored the first rushing touchdown in the very first Super Bowl?  Former LSU Tiger Jim Taylor.

29. Another trip down memory lane.  Steve Spurrier – on the Ed Sullivan Show in 1966.

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Bogus Coaching Rumors: Miles, Saban, Oh My

The deeper we get into November, the more coaches will be fired.  The more coaches are fired, the more rumors about current SEC coaches will swirl.  In fact, that’s already happening.

But SEC fans don’t have much to worry about… at this point.

According to multiple media reports in Colorado, Buffaloes coach Dan Hawkins could be fired as early as today.  Two weeks ago, a pair of Denver columnists speculated that Les Miles (LSU), Gus Malzahn (Auburn) and Jim McElwain (Alabama) would be on the Buffs’ list of potential replacements.  Don’t bank on it.

With his team in the top five of the BCS standings, it’s unlikely that Miles would depart Baton Rouge.  At the moment, he’s on top of the world again.  And most importantly, Colorado doesn’t have the money to lure in Miles.  The school is cash poor at the moment and it won’t be collecting a full partner’s share from the Pac-12 for a couple more years. 

Perhaps that’s why so many in Colorado are suggesting that CU turn to Miles’ old boss, Bill McCartney.  McCartney is now 70 and he hasn’t coached in 16 years.   But he wants the job and he’d be cheap.

That immediately pushes him ahead of Malzahn and McElwain.  McElwain’s stock, by the way, likely drops each time Alabama’s offense sputters.

Speaking of Alabama, the Nick Saban-to-the-Cowboys rumors have already taken root on SEC messageboards.  Cecil Hurt of The Tuscaloosa News said yesterday that he expected those rumors to pop:


“It’s possible that someone will float the Saban to Dallas rumor.  You’ll hear that until (Jerry Jones) hires someone for the job. … Saban has totally been up front about his NFL experience.  It won’t stop people from speculating though.”


No, it won’t.  But there’s no reason to believe Saban will coach anywhere other than Tuscaloosa next year.  Like many other college coaches who’ve given the pro game a shot, Saban returned to his roots at the first opportunity.

In Alabama he rules with an iron fist.  You can do that with college kids.  But try that with multimillionaire professional athletes and you’ll find that it doesn’t work for long.  (Unless you win a Super Bowl in your second season and give players a reason to by into your czar status… as Saban’s mentor Bill Belichick did in New England).

Also, we saw how long the marriage between Bill Parcells and Jones lasted in Dallas — four years.  A kingdom can’t have two kings.

For that reason, if Saban winds up with the Cowboys, I’ll eat Les Miles’ hat.

Be prepared to hear more whispers in the wind regarding SEC coaches, but it doesn’t look like the first two jobs on the market will be filled by men from the league’s toughest conference.

UPDATE — Hawkins has indeed been 86′d at Colorado.

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On Technology in Football Fandom: How Does Technology Condition the Fan’s Experience?

South Carolina
Content provided by Garnet And Black Attack.

This post is part of a three-part series sponsored by Samsung about the role of technology in sports fandom. Samsung was kind enough to give us a very broad topic and a lot of leeway in terms of what we can write about. I think most other blogs are probably going to participate in this series by hailing the virtues of the latest plasma / LCD technology. Since I’m not much of a gadget nut, I’m going to approach this in another (extremely sophomoric) way–at least for this post. Maybe next time I’ll write a more fanboy-ish column about how awesome it is to go to the local sports bar and have ten huge flat screens around me showing various games to watch. For now, I’m going to subject you to the following food for thought.

While the majority of the population hails technological advancements as the hallmarks of progress, there have always been some who have worried over technology. The Luddites railed against textile innovations that deprived them of jobs. Neil Postman believed that the advent of television left us unable to relate to the world in traditional, authentic ways. The list could go on. What a lot of these views about technology have in common is that they point to how things that we now accept as completely natural may have, in ways that we rarely think about, fundamentally changed the way that we experience the world. In this light, what are the implication of the advent of digital, internet, instant-data-transfer, and other technologies for following sports?

First, of course, the positives, the stuff we all love about the new hi-tech world of sports. It is, for instance, now infinitely easier than ever before to follow your favorite team. Once upon a time, it was next to impossible to follow recruiting in the way that the internet has now made possible. The information just wasn’t out there. These days, every Gamecock fan all over the country can get up the minute news about the latest commitment. Remember when we were all scouring the internet about Marcus Lattimore‘s recruitment in the days and hours leading up to his commitment? That’s a phenomenon with little precedent.

Technology has also made it really easy for a guy like me, who left Columbia a few years back, to follow Carolina football. Most games games are now nationally televised, and the ones that aren’t–including those against teams like Furman–are viewable on ESPN360. 30 years ago, before cable television and the internet, people like me wouldn’t be able to see those games, which would make being the kind of obsessive fans we are fairly difficult.

Is there anything that we’ve lost with the technological advances in fandom, though? I’m probably not the person to answer that question. I’m not old enough to remember what it was like before ESPN existed, and I’ve also had the benefit of the internet for most of my life. I do, though, feel that as with anything, there’s probably a payoff. I would imagine that going to or watching a game meant something a little bit different before it became so easy to do these things. Let’s imagine what it must have been like to be a Steelers fan in New York and to watch your team win the Super Bowl back in the 70s. You don’t get to watch games every week. Is it a more momentous occasion to watch the big one back then than it would be now? Is the actual experience of spectating different? Was there a certain pleasure in watching a game during this relatively low-tech time that we can’t achieve now? I would have to assume so, although, again, it’s hard for me to describe the how and why.

At the end of the day, though, this is essentially an academic exercise. Fandom is, mostly for the better, now thoroughly enmeshed in the world of the high tech. That’s the world we live in, and it will like become increasingly so in the coming years.


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On Technology in Football Fandom: How Does Technology Condition the Experience of Viewing?

South Carolina
Content provided by Garnet And Black Attack.

This post is part of a three-part series sponsored by Samsung about the role of technology in sports fandom. Samsung was kind enough to give us a very broad topic and a lot of leeway in terms of what we can write about. I think most other blogs are probably going to participate in this series by hailing the virtues of the latest plasma / LCD technology. Since I’m not much of a gadget nut, I’m going to approach this in another (extremely sophomoric) way–at least for this post. Maybe next time I’ll write a more fanboy-ish column about how awesome it is to go to the local sports bar and have ten huge flat screens around me showing various games to watch. For now, I’m going to subject you to the following food for thought.

While the majority of the population hails technological advancements as the hallmarks of progress, there have always been some who have worried over technology. The Luddites railed against textile innovations that deprived them of jobs. Neil Postman believed that the advent of television left us unable to relate to the world in traditional, authentic ways. The list could go on. What a lot of these views about technology have in common is that they point to how things that we now accept as completely natural may have, in ways that we rarely think about, fundamentally changed the way that we experience the world. In this light, what are the implication of the advent of digital, internet, instant-data-transfer, and other technologies for following sports?

First, of course, the positives, the stuff we all love about the new hi-tech world of sports. It is, for instance, now infinitely easier than ever before to follow your favorite team. Once upon a time, it was next to impossible to follow recruiting in the way that the internet has now made possible. The information just wasn’t out there. These days, every Gamecock fan all over the country can get up the minute news about the latest commitment. Remember when we were all scouring the internet about Marcus Lattimore‘s recruitment in the days and hours leading up to his commitment? That’s a phenomenon with little precedent.

Technology has also made it really easy for a guy like me, who left Columbia a few years back, to follow Carolina football. Most games games are now nationally televised, and the ones that aren’t–including those against teams like Furman–are viewable on ESPN360. 30 years ago, before cable television and the internet, people like me wouldn’t be able to see those games, which would make being the kind of obsessive fans we are fairly difficult.

Is there anything that we’ve lost with the technological advances in fandom, though? I’m probably not the person to answer that question. I’m not old enough to remember what it was like before ESPN existed, and I’ve also had the benefit of the internet for most of my life. I do, though, feel that as with anything, there’s probably a payoff. I would imagine that going to or watching a game meant something a little bit different before it became so easy to do these things. Let’s imagine what it must have been like to be a Steelers fan in New York and to watch your team win the Super Bowl back in the 70s. You don’t get to watch games every week. Is it a more momentous occasion to watch the big one back then than it would be now? Is the actual experience of spectating different? Was there a certain pleasure in watching a game during this relatively low-tech time that we can’t achieve now? I would have to assume so, although, again, it’s hard for me to describe the how and why.

At the end of the day, though, this is essentially an academic exercise. Fandom is, mostly for the better, now thoroughly enmeshed in the world of the high tech. That’s the world we live in, and it will like become increasingly so in the coming years.


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