Albama Arkansas Auburn Florida Georgia Kentucky LSU Mississippi State Missouri Ole-Miss USC Tennessee Texas A&M Vanderbilt

Auburn To Visit White House Next Friday

In keeping with our early-mornin’ Iron Bowl theme…

The BCS champion Auburn Tigers will be making the traditional winner’s trip to Washington, DC a week from today.

“On Friday, April 29, at 10:00 a.m. ET, President Obama will welcome Auburn University’s football team to the White House to honor the team’s 2010 BCS National Championship,” an Obama staffer said yesterday via email.

The first round of the NFL draft will be held next Thursday and it’s likely Cam Newton and Nick Fairley will be snapped up nice and early… meaning that they’ll likely be available to head to the White House on Friday if they choose to attend the ceremony.

Post Comments » No Comments

 

 

Auburn Dismisses Four Football Players Arrested For Robbery

Four Auburn football players have been arrested and charged with five counts of first degree robbery, according to the Auburn Police Department.

Those four players have been permanently dismissed from the team, according to Auburn.

The four players: safety Michael McNeil, wide receiver Antonio Goodwin, receiver Shaun Kitchens and tight end Dakota Mosley.

You can read the statement from the Auburn Police Department. All four players are charged with five counts of first degree robbery, one count of first degree burglary, and one count of third-degree theft of property.

According to Auburn police, five victims reported a theft of personal property early Friday morning. The victims told police that three black males were present with one holding a handgun. The four suspects were found with a pistol and the stolen property and then taken into custody, according to police.

Auburn coach Gene Chizik released the following statement:

“The players arrested in connection with this deeply troubling incident have been permanently dismissed from our football team. While we realize the legal process will run its course and these young men have a right for their case to be heard, playing for Auburn University is an honor and a privilege. It is not a right.

“We hold our student-athletes to a high standard of conduct on and off the field as representatives of Auburn University, and this kind of behavior is not tolerated.

“I am extremely disappointed an embarrassed by the actions of these individuals. I want to personally apologize to all of those who were impacted by this senseless act, including the victims, Auburn University and the Auburn family.”

Post Comments » Comments (6)

 

 

Moore Now Brings Florida Into The Newton Fray

Radio host Scott Moore spoke with The Huntsville Times yesterday and now he’s thrown out an accusation that Florida’s Urban Meyer was the initial whistleblower in L’affaire Newton.

“Urban made the call and The New York Times acted on it.”  That’s what Moore says NCAA investigators told his buddy, former Mississippi State quarterback John Bond.

“There’s some other stuff that will come out in the coming weeks that might set the record straight a little bit,” Moore told Mark McCarter of The Times.  “There’s some things I have not heard, some things that I’m supposed to hear that will tie all this together.”

Of course there is.

Amazingly, while Moore has gone on radio show after radio show quoting audio tapes that he has refused to play and making accusations against the Newtons, Auburn, Tennessee and now Urban Meyer, he feels that his reputation has been unfairly attacked.

“This is not a smear campaign against (Auburn), although one has certainly been waged against me this week.  That’s part of the territory, I reckon.”

I reckon so.  When you accuse people and schools of cheating without providing proof — while also starting a radio show and claiming that the tapes are “valuable” — people will naturally begin to ask questions about your character.

McCarter asked Moore why he’s doing what he’s doing.  “I’m not doing it for the radio show,” Moore said.  “I’m not out to destroy anybody.  I don’t want to see Auburn University destroyed.  I don’t have a vendetta against Auburn University.  I’m just reporting on a story that’s now mushroomed into one of the biggest stories in college football history.”

As The Times points out, Moore “was wearing warmup pants with the (Alabama) logo (on them) as he went on-air Wednesday night.”

In a final note, Moore has spent a week now making claims and allegations without playing the audiot tapes.  After getting ripped for his actions, he claimed this week that he’s not going to play the tapes until he can verify them.  Nevermind the fact that he’s been quoting them without verifying them.  So does Moore even have these tapes in his possession?

“I can’t confirm or deny that.”

What a shock.

Post Comments » Comments (14)

 

 

The Nutbags Strike Back: Updyke’s Family Gets Death Threats

Shock of shocks, the quacky act of Harvey Updyke — “Al from Dadeville” on “The Paul Finebaum Show” — has flushed out a few more crazies.  The family of the man who poisoned Auburn’s oak trees now claims to be receiving death threats from Tiger fans.  And I don’t doubt it for a second.

“We have children and grandchildren getting death threats from Auburn fans,” a man claiming to be Updyke’s son told The Mobile Press-Register.  “We’re having to pull teenagers, 13- and 14-year-old kids, out of school because people are threatening them.”

Who didn’t see this coming?  In fact, we said yesterday morning that this type of nonsense — from the other side of the rivalry — was to be expected.  Heck, everyone knew this was coming.

Finebaum told ESPN.com’s Mark Schlabach that he expects the UA-AU rivalry to become even more heated following Updyke’s attack on Toomer’s Corner.  “I almost hate to say what I should say — that perhaps I’m surprised we haven’t seen anything worse.  I think it will get worse.  I really do.”

Hey, nutjobs, here’s how you lose sympathy in a situation like this: You make death threats against innocent people.  Those oak trees were a symbol of Auburn University and AU fans have every right to be sad, mad and disgusted.  But they were trees.  Threatening to kill people is not a proportional response.  The best response, of course, would be to do nothing except buck up, move forward and show clowns like Updyke that they can’t get under your skin.

As for Updyke, he has a daughter named Crimson and a son named Bear.  His son — not sure if it was “Bear” or not –  said that his father has a pacemaker and suffers from kidney failure, high blood pressure and diabetes, and is on 21 different medications.  He also said his 62-year-old father is being treated like “a rapist or a murderer… he hasn’t been convicted yet.”

He hasn’t been convicted, but he did call a nationally syndicated radio show to say that he killed the trees.  And that he didn’t care if the act was illegal.  Good look to his court-appointed attorney beating that one.

In addition, WAAY-TV in Huntsville, Alabama reports that Updyke has been arrested twice before — in 1996 (criminal mischief) and in 2004 (theft).


UPDATEKevin Scarbinsky of The Birmingham News writes that “clean, old fashioned hate in this state has started to give way to a more dangerous level of contempt.”  The writer concludes: “Sadly, those trees may be beyond saving.  Let’s hope the rivalry itself isn’t too far gone.”

Post Comments » Comments (16)

 

 

Meet The Moron: Al From Dadeville

Harvey Updyke — aka “Al from Dadeville” — has a Facebook page it seems.  On it he claims to be a retired Texas State Trooper.  A photo shows him holding a baby and wearing a houndstooth Alabama cap.

First thought: It’s sad that someone could be so twisted that he would screw up his whole life over a sports rivalry.

Second thought: Never get pulled over by a Texas State Trooper.  Apparently it doesn’t take much to get on their force.

UPDATE — Updyke faces one count of criminal mischief in the first degree, which is a Class C felony.  If convicted, he could face one to 10 years of prison. 

More charges could be made.

The FBI, US Marshals Service, State of Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries, Tallapoosa County Sheriff’s Office, Dadeville Police Department, and Auburn University are all involved in the case.

No other arrests are expected.

Post Comments » Comments (21)

 

 

Auburn Facing Big Roster Changes (In Basketball)

When I mention “Auburn University” and “roster turnover” you probably think of the Tigers’ football team which will have to reinvent itself in 2011.  But there’s plenty of change on the horizon for AU’s basketball program, too.

The NCAA allows college basketball teams to carry 13 scholarship players.  But if no one washes out of Tony Barbee’s program before next season, his incoming class of three newcomers will bring Auburn’s total to 15.  And that’s if Barbee doesn’t sign anyone else between now and this summer.

In other words, some families that were recruited and promised a scholarship for Junior are about to get some bad news.

As Evan Woodbery of The Mobile Press-Register points out today, sophomore center Rob Chubb’s recent arrest might aide in Barbee’s decision-making.  Chubb has been charged by Auburn city police with public intoxication, disorderly conduct, attempting to elude police and resisting arrest.  He is currently suspended indefinitely from the team.

Chubb’s crimes were not violent in nature.  In fact, they were typical college-age, dumb type of crimes.  We’re not saying what he did was right, but his actions are not the type of crimes that normally get a player dismissed from a team.  Especially when that player has shown — as Chubb has — that he can score 18 points in an SEC game.

But Auburn’s numbers situation may cause Barbee to take a tougher stance with Chubb than he might normally take.  So stay tuned…

Post Comments » No Comments

 

 

Ignorance is Bliss: NCAA Opens Huge Can of Worms by Reinstating Auburn Tigers QB Cameron Newton’s Eligibility

Georgia
Content provided by Dawg Sports.

A couple of readers already have beaten me to the punch on this one, but it bears amplification: Cameron Newton was determined by the NCAA to have been the subject of an amateurism violation, as a result of which the Auburn Tigers declared him ineligible, . . . and the reinstatement committee moved with unprecedented swiftness immediately to reinstate his eligibility.

This is ridiculous. The NCAA determined that Cecil Newton and Kenny Rogers attempted to “market the student-athlete as a part of a pay-for-play scenario in return for Newton’s commitment to attend college and play football“—in short, that the allegations we have heard in the press essentially were true (and these are the “facts of the case agreed upon by Auburn University and the NCAA enforcement staff”)—but, because this scheme ostensibly was orchestrated by his father (who, by all accounts, including Cam Newton’s, wielded enormous sway over his son’s choice), the younger Newton has been cleared to play without conditions, while the elder Newton has had his “access” to the Auburn program “limited.” Gee, that’s a heck of a punishment for a guy whose son has two games left in his career on the Plains.

The NCAA determined on Monday that a violation had occurred. Auburn declared Newton ineligible on Tuesday. The NCAA reinstated Newton on Wednesday. How long did the sword hang over the heads of the players, coaches, and administrators in Athens, Chapel Hill, Columbia, and Tuscaloosa while the NCAA left those programs twisting in the wind earlier this year? Might the fact that there now are television ratings and BCS bowl dollars to consider have caused the NCAA’s glacial pace to be replaced with lightning swiftness?

As noted by Year2, though, this is far from an acquittal, much less an exoneration. Reports the NCAA in a carefully-worded release:

Based on the information available to the reinstatement staff at this time, we do not have sufficient evidence that Cam Newton or anyone from Auburn was aware of this activity. . . .

Reinstatement decisions are independent of the NCAA enforcement process and typically are made once the facts of the student-athlete’s involvement are determined. The reinstatement process is likely to conclude prior to the close of an investigation.

In short, Auburn could still pay the price for this one, even though the NCAA apparently has concluded that Auburn merely being Auburn is not sufficient evidence of Auburn cheating. (This presumption is fair in a technical legal sense, although it is open to debate whether it is reasonable in reality.)

In the meantime, though, Clay Travis’s concerns suddenly seem much more important. Just think how much better the Georgia Bulldogs’ season might have been if A.J. Green had told the NCAA that his father was the one who signed onto Facebook and sold that jersey. Cam Newton’s NCAA defense basically boils down to this: “My own father appears to have shopped me around like chattel property, but it’s all right, because he was consistent enough in his treatment of me as a fungible commodity rather than as a human being not to give me any of whatever money he may have received in the deal.”

As fans, our fervent hope when someone associated with our preferred sports program is accused of wrongdoing is that we’re not backing the wrong horse. At the end of the day, our strong desire is to be able to say, “Everyone involved was innocent.” Given the facts as determined by the NCAA and agreed to by Auburn University, no Tiger fan can make such a claim here. There is a wide divide separating “proven innocent” from “insufficient evidence.” When your history of going undefeated on the gridiron invariably coincides with seasons in which at least one of your sports programs was on probation, though, you become accustomed to having to take your successes any way you can find them.

There are no moral victories at Auburn, but, for all the sighs of relief being heard on the Plains today, we now have been given reason by the NCAA to believe that there have been a dozen immoral victories at Auburn this season . . . and counting.

Go ‘Dawgs!


Post Comments » No Comments

 

 

More Answers (And More Questions) In The Newton Case

Just a few more notes from the NCAA on the Cam Newton case today:


* Regarding Auburn’s declaration of Newton as ineligible yesterday, the governing body noted that “When a school discovers an NCAA rules violation has occurred, it must declare the student-athlete ineligible and may request the student-athlete’s eligibility be reinstated.  Reinstatement decisions are made by the NCAA national office staff and can include conditions such as withholding from competition and repayment of extra benefits.  Newton was reinstated without any conditions.”

* The NCAA also spoke of what Newton’s violations involved.  “According to facts of the case agreed upon by Auburn University and the NCAA enforcement staff, the student-athlete’s father and an owner of a scouting service worked together to actively market the student-athlete as a part of a pay-for-play scenario in return for Newton’s commitment to attend college and play football.  NCAA rules (Bylaw 12.3.3) do not allow individuals or entities to represent a prospective student-athlete for compensation to a school for an athletic scholarship.”

* The NCAA also said: “In determining how a violation impacts a student-athlete’s eligibility, we must consider the young person’s responsibility.  Based on the information available to the reinstatement staff at this time, we don not have sufficient evidence that Cam Newton or anyone from Auburn was aware of this activity, which led to his reinstatement.  From a student-athlete reinstatement perspective, Auburn University met its obligation under NCAA bylaw 14.11.1.  Under this threshold, the student-athlete has not participated while ineligible.”

* SEC commissioner Mike Slive said the following: “The conduct of Cam Newton’s father and the involved individual is unacceptable and has no place in the SEC or in intercollegiate athletics.  The actions taken by Auburn University and Mississippi State University make it clear this behavior will not be tolerated in the SEC.”

* Auburn AD Jay Jacobs had the following comment: “We are pleased that the NCAA has agreed with our position that Cam Newton has been and continues to be eligible to play football at Auburn University.  We appreciate the diligence and professionalism of the NCAA and its handling of this matter.”


A few questions that you are SURE to be hearing in the next few hours:


* Is the NCAA rushing to an “He’s good to play” decision simply to avoid more controversy as college football rolls into the bowl season?

* Why is the SEC taking no action on this matter when its own bylaws seem to state pretty clearly that anyone asking for cash should be ineligible?

* Why did a player like AJ Green receive a four-game suspension for selling a jersey for $1,000 while Newton has been served with no punishment?  Sure, no money changed hands in Newton’s case, but still isn’t $180,000 in the bush worth $1,000 in hand?

* Is this investigation completely over?  And what if it’s eventually found that Auburn did have some illegal dealings with Newton?

* How in the world did Auburn keep Newton’s brief period of ineligibility quiet?  Amazing stuff.


FYI — If you catch a typo or two in the above post, please forgive me.  I’m trying to race to get all the key information to you while also handling several radio interviews… and preparing for a couple of hits on CSS’ “SportsNite” tonight.
 

Post Comments » Comments (7)

 

 

NCAA Addresses Cam Newton’s Eligibility

Auburn University football student-athlete Cam Newton is immediately eligible to compete, according to a decision today by the NCAA student-athlete reinstatement staff. The NCAA concluded on Monday that a violation of amateurism rules occurred, therefore Auburn University declared the student-athlete ineligible yesterday for violations of NCAA amateurism rules.
(more)

Post Comments » No Comments

 

 

Auburn University football student-athlete Cam Newton is immediately eligible to compete, according…

LSU
Content provided by And The Valley Shook.

Auburn University football student-athlete Cam Newton is immediately eligible to compete, according to a decision today by the NCAA student-athlete reinstatement staff. The NCAA concluded on Monday that a violation of amateurism rules occurred, therefore Auburn University declared the student-athlete ineligible yesterday for violations of NCAA amateurism rules.

According to facts of the case agreed upon by Auburn University and the NCAA enforcement staff, the student-athlete’s father and an owner of a scouting service worked together to actively market the student-athlete as a part of a pay-for-play scenario in return for Newton’s commitment to attend college and play football. NCAA rules (Bylaw 12.3.3) do not allow individuals or entities to represent a prospective student-athlete for compensation to a school for an athletic scholarship.

In conjunction with the case, Auburn University has limited the access Newton’s father has to the athletics program and Mississippi State has disassociated the involved individual.

“The conduct of Cam Newton’s father and the involved individual is unacceptable and has no place in the SEC or in intercollegiate athletics,” said Mike Slive, Southeastern Conference Commissioner. “The actions taken by Auburn University and Mississippi State University make it clear this behavior will not be tolerated in the SEC.”

“We are pleased that the NCAA has agreed with our position that Cam Newton has been and continues to be eligible to play football at Auburn University,” Auburn University Director of Athletics Jay Jacobs said. “We appreciate the diligence and professionalism of the NCAA and its handling of this matter. “


Post Comments » No Comments

 

 



Follow Us On:
Mobile MrSEC