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Tigers Breeze Past Ga. Southwestern, 78-50

Andre Malone scored 17 points and Rob Chubb added 12 as the Auburn Tigers breezed past Division II Georgia Southwestern, 78-50, Tuesday at the Auburn Arena.
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Gamecocks Begin Championship Week

The SEC Eastern Division champion South Carolina Gamecocks (9-3, 5-3 SEC) worked out Monday night in Williams-Brice Stadium as they began preparations for Saturday’s SEC Championship Game against the undefeated Auburn Tigers (12-0, 8-0 SEC).
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SEC Power Poll Ballot: Week 13

South Carolina
Content provided by Garnet And Black Attack.

Powerpoll2010logo_medium
1. Auburn Tigers

Auburn just netted one of its most memorable wins in program history. Can they follow it up by winning even bigger prizes?

2. Arkansas Razorbacks

Arkansas was certainly no 2010 version of 2009 Ole Miss. Unfortunately for the Hogs, though, they picked the wrong year to have a great team.

3. LSU Tigers

Not the ending the Tigers wanted, but still a good season for them. They’re back in the SEC’s upper echelon.

4. South Carolina Gamecocks

The Gamecocks have come on very strong since the embarrassing loss to Arkansas.

5. Alabama Crimson Tide

The Tide have been good this year, but their fans have to be disappointed considering pre-season expectations.

6. Mississippi St. Bulldogs

Dan Mullen wrapped up a good sophomore season in Starkville. Will the Bulldogs be able to keep him when suitors come knocking?

7. Florida Gators

The Gators just want this season to end as soon as possible.

8. Georgia Bulldogs

Ditto for the Bulldogs.

9. Tennessee Volunteers

The Vols ended the regular season on a positive note.

10. Kentucky Wildcats

This season ended up looking like a lot of past ones for UK. Lots of wins over cupcakes, one signature upset over a good SEC team, a win over Vanderbilt, and not much else.

11. Mississippi Rebels

Is the Nuttster on the hot seat in Oxford?

12. Vanderbilt Commodores

Meh.


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Tigers Drop Home Game to Jacksonville

Earnest Ross recorded a double-double with 18 points and 11 rebounds as the Auburn Tigers dropped a 69-55 decision to the visiting Jacksonville Dolphins at the Auburn Arena. Rob Chubb added 10 points and seven boards for the Tigers.
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No. 9 Alabama Falls to No. 2 Auburn, 28-27

The No. 9 Alabama football team lost for first time in its last 20 games at home, dropping a 28-27 decision in the 75th Iron Bowl to the No. 2 Auburn Tigers on Friday before a capacity crowd of 101,821 at Bryant-Denny Stadium
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Another New Wrinkle Regarding Cecil Newton’s Church, and Why Even Minor Revelations in the Cameron Newton Investigation are Bad News for the Auburn Tigers

Georgia
Content provided by Dawg Sports.

By now, we’ve all seen the message board analysis of the background to the Cameron Newton case, which stops only just short of parroting the conspiracy theory espoused by the Scottish father from “So I Married an Axe Murderer.” Personally, I see no need to go to such great lengths to malign the Auburn Tigers, when the plainly obvious facts suffice so nicely.

Much has been made of the allegation that Holy Zion Center of Deliverance, Inc., the church of which Cecil Newton serves as pastor and chief executive officer, purportedly was having financial difficulties at the time Cam Newton was being recruited by Auburn, Mississippi State, and other suitors. I do not know whether this is true, and I make neither an assertion nor an assumption either way.

What complicates matters even more than they already have been, though, is the fact that Holy Zion Center of Deliverance, Inc., does not appear to be a valid Georgia non-profit entity at the present time.

The church originally was incorporated in 1991, with Cecil Newton as the named incorporator, but the corporation appears to have been administratively dissolved on May 16, 2008, well before the events surrounding Cam Newton’s recruitment are alleged to have occurred.

I don’t want to oversell the importance of the church’s evident dissolution as a corporate entity; under Georgia law, an administratively dissolved non-profit corporation may apply for reinstatement, and, if the application is granted, the law treats the corporation as though it had been in uninterrupted existence the entire time. In fact, it appears that Holy Zion Center of Deliverance, Inc., was dissolved before, in 1993, and reinstated in 2003 as a result of an application for reinstatement filed by Cecil Newton.

In short, this latest twist in a saga that grows more convoluted with each passing day probably means absolutely nothing, but I find it interesting—baffling, really—that, at a time when the church was under fire from city officials and under investigation by local newspapers, no one seems to have bothered to check to see if the church still existed as a legal entity, and, if not, why not. Cecil Newton has submitted bank statements from the church, suggesting that it remains in operation, but at least one report indicates that neighbors say “the church hasn’t been used in months.” The administrative dissolution of Holy Zion Center of Deliverance, Inc., very well may have been due to a simple failure to renew the corporation’s annual registration, but the articles of amendment filed with the Georgia Secretary of State in 2005 indicate that, upon the dissolution of the corporation, the church’s assets were to be distributed for tax-exempt purposes, so it matters whether Holy Zion Center of Deliverance, Inc., has closed its doors or merely needs to file the paperwork to be reinstated.

It is quite standard for a non-profit entity applying for tax-exempt status from the IRS to provide for the distribution of its assets to other tax-exempt entities upon dissolving, so there is nothing the least bit odd about that language. Now that the FBI is involved, though, considerations concerning compliance with the Internal Revenue Code become relevant.

According to the Coweta County real estate records available on-line, Holy Zion Center of Deliverance, Inc., purchased its building in July 2003. (Presumably, that purchase is what prompted the reinstatement of the corporation earlier that year.) If the corporation ceased to exist in 2008, that property should have gone for tax-exempt use to another church or charitable organization. The timelines appearing in media reports seem to indicate that, during much of the time that Holy Zion Center for Deliverance, Inc., purportedly was trying to make repairs to its building, Holy Zion Center for Deliverance, Inc., did not, strictly speaking, exist.

More often than not, corporations are administratively dissolved due to clerical oversights when someone simply forgets to file the proper paperwork with the Secretary of State. There is no reason to believe anything more sinister occurred here, particularly since Holy Zion Center of Deliverance, Inc., apparently went through a similar dissolution with no ill effects upon reinstatement. As Paul Westerdawg noted, though, the only two people you would less rather see in your front yard than an FBI agent are an IRS agent and Jim Cantore. If, as appears to be the case, Cecil Newton’s church was dissolved (even innocently and accidentally) as a non-profit entity, questions could arise concerning the assets of the defunct corporation. The process of providing satisfactory answers to those inquiries will produce further grist for the mill.

Like everyone else who is following this story from the outside, I have no idea who is telling the truth and what, if anything, is being concealed. The Newtons are entitled to the presumption of innocence, both legally and morally, and I do not suppose that the ostensible dissolution of the church resulted from anything more than carelessness.

Nevertheless, there reportedly is an ongoing federal investigation into these matters, which appear to involve a now-nonexistent non-profit corporation continuing to operate as a tax-exempt entity. Even if (as likely is the case) all of this is entirely innocuous, some intrepid IRS agent may ask about the possibility of benefits to private interests with respect to this legally-defunct church.

The more areas into which government agents believe they have cause to poke and prod, the more information they are going to unearth that the NCAA otherwise might not have gotten, and the less of a priority the continued collegiate eligibility of Cameron Newton (who likely is three games away from ending his amateur career, in any case) will be to the quarterback and his father. The more questions are asked by agents in the employ of the federal government, the more the NCAA will begin to look like small potatoes. Even if those federal agents ultimately conclude that everything is on the up and up, their presence on the scene is not good news for Auburn.

Every new wrinkle renders more complex a situation the Tiger faithful have been hoping will end with a simple explanation. The longer this goes on, and the deeper this goes, the worse it will be for the Plainsmen, and it doesn’t look like there will be a cessation of revelations anytime soon.

Go ‘Dawgs!


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"The Dawg Gone Podcast" Covers Rivalry Between Georgia Bulldogs and Auburn Tigers

Georgia
Content provided by Dawg Sports.

“The Dawg Gone Podcast” is available at iTunes and up at the DawgGoneBlog (where Kit Kitchens conscientiously has corrected an inadvertent factual error contained in the program), and you should be able to listen to it by clicking the link below:

DawgGone Podcast (Auburn)

If you haven’t heard it already, it falls under the heading of NSFW. You have been warned.

Go ‘Dawgs! Auburna delenda est!


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SEC Power Poll Ballot: Week Ten

South Carolina
Content provided by Garnet And Black Attack.

A fan holds up a sign after South Carolina returned from Florida after South Carolina's 36-14 win over Florida in an NCAA college football game, early Sunday, Nov. 14, 2010, in Columbia, S.C. No. 17 South Carolina is heading to its first Southeastern Conference championship game after winning the East division. (AP Photo/The State, Kim Kim Foster-Tobin)

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Kim Kim Foster-Tobin – AP

about 6 hours ago:

A fan holds up a sign after South Carolina returned from Florida after South Carolina’s 36-14 win over Florida in an NCAA college football game, early Sunday, Nov. 14, 2010, in Columbia, S.C. No. 17 South Carolina is heading to its first Southeastern Conference championship game after winning the East division. (AP Photo/The State, Kim Kim Foster-Tobin)

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1. Auburn Tigers

2. LSU Tigers

3. Alabama Crimson Tide

4. Arkansas Razorbacks

5. South Carolina Gamecocks

6. Mississippi St. Bulldogs

7. Florida Gators

8. Georgia Bulldogs

9. Kentucky Wildcats

10. Tennessee Volunteers

11. Mississippi Rebels

12. Vanderbilt Commodores


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Auburn Tigers 49, Georgia Bulldogs 31: We’ll Use the Toilet Paper from Toomer’s Corner to Wipe Our Asterisk Into the Record Book

Georgia
Content provided by Dawg Sports.

I congratulate the Auburn Tigers on their victory in a back-and-forth game that was much closer than the score indicated. As with the Georgia Bulldogs‘ loss to the Florida Gators, it was a great game to watch if you weren’t emotionally invested in the result. I am proud of the Red and Black for going on the road and playing toe-to-toe with the best team in college football, which is led by the best player in college football.

Last spring, David Hale asked, “[W]ill you stick by Richt if Georgia finishes 8-5 again this year, but does it with a more fundamentally sound D, a better approach to kickoffs and a duo at tailback that understands how to play the position?” At the time, I rejected the premise, writing: “I don’t believe a more fundamentally sound defense, a better approach to kickoffs, and an effective tailback tandem can fail to produce a record better than last year’s.”

I was wrong. The 2010 Georgia squad will finish with the worst record of the Mark Richt era, but it is a much better team than the 2006, 2008, or 2009 editions of the Red and Black, which bodes well for the future. Some frustrated Georgia fans take the view that, although Coach Richt is entitled to one more year, he needs to prove himself in 2011 by winning at least ten games. Regardless of whether you agree with that position, I believe the play of this team down the stretch indicates that such a special season next year is very much in the cards, and I, for one, am excited about the Bulldogs’ prospects. Right now, I feel about as good as it is possible to feel in the wake of a loss to a despised rival.

Regarding the “despised rival” part, I often am I asked why I hate Auburn so much. No one who watched the last five minutes of this football game needs to wonder why I feel the way I do about the Bulldogs’ oldest rival, but, just in case it wasn’t clear, let me spell it out for you: Auburn is dirty.

Auburn is the dirtiest program in SEC history, which is saying something. Shug Jordan, one of the namesakes of Auburn’s stadium, got the Tigers put on probation. Pat Dye, the namesake of Auburn’s football field, got the Tigers put on probation. Terry Bowden was on tape discussing Auburn’s dishonest recruiting practices. The Tigers were the kings of the chop block under Tommy Tuberville. Auburn put its university accreditation in jeopardy in a sleazy attempt to replace a coach who had not been fired. Bobby Lowder, when not causing his bank to fail, has been one of college football’s most embarrassingly involved big-money boosters. Now, to top it all off, we have the inaccurately-named Nick Fairley spending the entire game delivering cheap-shot late hits to Aaron Murray, and, when the Georgia offensive line decides to exact a little—a very little—retribution for his dirty play, the Tigers respond by earning a pair of ejections for fisticuffs.

Some will say this is sour grapes. It’s not; the Tigers were the better team today, and they won this game on the field. (Whether the NCAA will allow them to keep that win in the record book remains to be seen.) The Plainsmen’s late-game extracurriculars, though, serve as a reminder of the truth of all the criticisms of Auburn I have offered over the years, so, when you see the words “I hate Auburn” appear here, you should understand that I mean them, and that I have valid reasons for the sincerity of the sentiment.

There are plenty of good Auburn people out there; some of them frequent this site, and many of them may be found at our SB Nation sister site, Track ‘em Tigers. A few good apples can’t redeem a rotten bunch, though, and, when an Auburn man calls a Georgia man a son of a bitch, he would do well to remember that it takes one to know one.

Go ‘Dawgs!


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Saturday Evening College Football Open Comment Thread

Georgia
Content provided by Dawg Sports.

As promised, here is your Saturday night general college football discussion thread, to be used to discuss those late gridiron games occurring after the Georgia Bulldogs‘ tilt with the Auburn Tigers in Jordan-Hare Stadium. Have at it.

Go ‘Dawgs!


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