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ESPN The Magazine Tackles Manziel Mania

johnny-manziel-holds-ball-smilesLet’s see.  Johnny Manziel is now the focus of a new piece from “ESPN The Magazine” writer Wright Thompson.  There’s some interesting stuff in the piece, but a few Texas A&M fans have let me know that I should stop writing about Johnny Football.  In their maroon-glazed eyes, it’s clear that I hate their quarterback.

What to do?  What to do?

Well, as an SEC site I guess we’re gonna have to go ahead and share some of the juicier tidbits from the new profile.  And we’ll give you our take — including how those around him are failing Manziel — at the bottom of the piece.  Among the key takeaways:

 

*  Playing golf with his father — in the hopes of easing the frustrations of living under the media (and social media) microscope — Manziel angrily flings a club after a poor shot.  That leads to this passage from Thompson:

“Paul (Manziel’s father) sees the club toss but doesn’t say anything.  Not yet, not until he clams his own anger and frustration.  Johnny needs to grow up or risk losing his future, and every thrown club, or ill-advised tweet, reminds his father how far they have to go.  Paul is scared.

‘I don’t enjoy playing golf with him because I don’t want to see that temper,’ he’ll say later.  ‘I honestly do not.  I cringe when he wants to play golf.  I don’t want to do it, but I know I have to do it.  Because he still needs love.  He still needs guidance.  He still needs to see he’s wrong — and how to control his temper.  And if I give up on him, who’s gonna take over?  The school sure the hell isn’t gonna do it.”

Uh-oh.

 

*  Of the parking ticket incident — the one Manziel turned into a national story by tweeting that he looked forward to getting out of College Station — Thompson quotes Manziel’s father as saying the local police “are harassing him.”

 

*  Somehow this next one managed to fly under our radar.  After Manziel’s “I can’t wait to leave” tweet, A&M’s student newspaper ran a column headlined: “Johnny, Be Gone.”  The opinion-piece urged Manziel to leave after the upcoming football season.  Now that was probably one college student columnist overreacting to the tweeted overreaction of fellow student, Manziel.  Still, that’s the kind of thing that would most definitely get under the skin of an athlete who’s putting his body on the line for their shared school.

 

*  Manziel has hired a high school buddy to act as his assistant and manager, “handling media requests and helping coordinate the bodyguards from Houston whom Johnny’s parents would like them to hire whenever they go out, making sure there’s someone around to defuse a confrontation before it begins.”  That friend — upon reading a story about Manziel’s near suspension from A&M a year ago — said, “That’s someone in the school talking.”  Thompson writes:

“He’s suspicious about this story, which credits an unnamed source.  Nate thinks Texas A&M is leaking on its star quarterback, and in the end it doesn’t even really matter if that is true or not.  there’s been a growing rift between the school and its most important student.  It’s not just Nate’s paranoia about the story, or Johnny’s frustrations with the nonfootball, marketing expectation of the school, or his father’s sense of injustice that everyone makes money off his son but his son.  The rift is more profound.  Many people close to Johnny Manziel no longer believe in the integrity of the institutions charged with protecting him.”

Hmmm.  Think now that Kevin Sumlin should have helped his QB by banning him from Twitter?  This is a young man with a temper.  A young man with a temper who likes to have a cocktail or two.  Mix in Twitter and that’s a volatile combination.  If Sumlin — or Manziel’s parents — had barred Johnny Football from Twitter, we would have never heard of his desire to leave College Station.  He would have never grown frustrated about the reaction to his tweet.  The Manziel Mania that surrounds him wouldn’t be so great if 400,000 people weren’t following his every move via that social media platform.

If Sumlin or Manziel’s parents had had the foresight to say “knock it off,” the circus around the quarterback today would not require so big a tent.

(On a sidenote, you gotta wonder what former South Carolina quarterback Stephen Garcia will think when he reads this piece.  Aggie AD Eric Hyman certainly rained on Garcia’s parade in Columbia.  While the quarterback brought quite a bit of his troubles on himself — don’t we all? — he’ll likely not be surprised to find that the Manziel family has lost faith in an athletic department run by his old AD.)

 

*  But should we expect that kind of leadership from Manziel’s parents?  According to Thompson, his folks wanted to get license plates that said “jffmom” and “jffdad.”  That would stand for “Johnny F—— Football’s mom” and “Johnny F—— Footbally’s dad.”  Their 17-year-old daughter had to “point out the bad example that might set for the kids who looked up to her brother.”

Wow.

 

*  According to Thompson, both of Manziel’s parents believe this will be their son’s last in College Station.  No surprise there.  But the writer says that the parents are worried what this final year in college might bring.  According to Paul Manziel: “Yeah, it could come unraveled.  And when it does, it’s gonna be bad.  Real bad.”

 

The piece goes on from there.  It’s a fascinating read.

Some A&M fans will read the piece and be scared witless by details revealed revealed in this profile of their hero.  The vast majority, however,  will likely blow it off as anti-Aggie spin from an ESPN machine that hates A&M and the SEC.  (Pay no attention to the multi-million dollar checks sent from Bristol to Birmingham every month.)

The reality is that we’re all watching the rise and fall of a star.  Offer kids the world on a string and most will snatch it out of your hand before you finish your sentence.  There are only so many Tim Tebows.  Unlike St. Timothy, Manziel has chosen to suck the marrow out of life and all his carpe diem’ing has turned his life into a frenzy in a fishbowl.

No one has aided him by saying, “no,” or by taking the loaded Twitter gun from his hand.  Instead, he’s been coddled and protected and anyone who’s suggested that the poor guy needs some help on the maturity front has been labeled a hater.

Well, I think a case could be made that Manziel’s got way too many lovers and could use a few haters in his life.  And that case is made pretty strongly in Thompson’s “ESPN The Magazine” piece.

 


34 comments
pbrstreetgang
pbrstreetgang

Still not sure what JFF has done wrong, at least morally. But he's created his own monster and it would appear that his parents have done nothing more than enable him. I'm still baffled by why anyone would care where he goes, who he dates and how much he drinks as long as he stays out of trouble. That said, many Aggies are starting to wonder if he is really one of them. And if he and Daddy Paul start blaming the university for his problems, then there will likely be little love lost once he leaves College Station for greener pastures. As far as Sumlin is concerned, I think we're all getting a taste of the Sumlin management style. Everyone is self-serving to some extent, but my gestalt is that Sumlin is more so than most. In a few years, when Sumlin and JFF are both in the NFL (although not necessarily successful), Aggies will look back fondly on their brief time in Aggieland, embrace the program they helped build and the new coach who will plant firm roots in the Brazos Valley. Hopefully that wil be Larry Fedora.

MoKelly1
MoKelly1

I will make a prediction. Johnny Manziel will be just as good, if not better, than last year. After A&M wins their first really huge game, he will be an even bigger star and all this off-season-we-got-nothing-to-do-or-say stuff will melt away like ice in Houston in August. No one will remember or care about any of the off-field stuff that, we should remember, hasn't involved anyone getting injured. Its all words.

tbear57
tbear57

The sports media, in true TMZ fashion, fanned the flames of Manziel's meteoric rise from one of four quarterbacks that could start for Sumlin to the pinnacle of college football, riding his coat tails to the top. Now, perhaps due to having too much time on their hands, that same media prys at every crack in that Heisman statue in an attempt to remain relevent. The sports world makes heroes of athletes and when their humanity is exposed tears them down in a like effort to get the next big story.  Would that football season was here and the reporting would revert to the game itself.    

quad77
quad77

go home johnny tamu and mizzou, our commish wanted you not us


viciousdawg
viciousdawg

I am getting tired of reading about spoiled brat Johnny. He should ride the bench for a game or two.

bigreb
bigreb

What will the reaction be to papa Manziel's statement that Texas A&M is being selfish in all this surrounding his son? Is any one player bigger than the team?

BonzaiB
BonzaiB

Well, I do not feel sorry for, or feel the need to feel sorry for, Manziel. He looks a lot more like Joe Namath to me than most players, and Broadway Joe was pretty "irresponsible and out of control" when he was younger. I watched one of my Division Artillery Commanders (that's a full colonel in the Army, a guy with 25 plus years in, vetted by 5 promotion boards, selected for 3 senior staff and command schools, etc, etc) throw a $25,000 shotgun, a gift from some Saudi prince for great service during the Gulf War, against a tree because he had a bad day at sporting clays. It is way to premature to write a 20 something year old quarterback off because he likes to party, is a bit arrogant, can't control his temper in golf, etc. I watched his performance against Bama, UF, and OU last year. His temperment on the field was just fine. This type of stuff is a big yawner. Yeah, folks are going to write about it and sensationalize it, and all the bad predictions of personal self destruction may come true, but Mr Manziel is not any more likely to self destruct than any other guy with his personality type. And there are a lot of them out there. Am I criticizing folks for writing about it? Nope, sports is a business and sports writers write about Manziel because people actually read it. I just did, so be kind of stupid for me to say there is too much of it out there.

I just think there are a lot of folks out there making more of this than it is. Could be wrong, but my personal history around driven, type A personalities with tempers is..... there are a lot of them who just know how to win at work, no matter how screwed up their equalibrium is at play. 

HoustonVol
HoustonVol

You have to remember, to have access like this to his life, he had to allow them in. This article was an attempt by JM, his manager(s), and/or the family to try and make people feel sorry for him. They want you to  try and see his side of life. To show how hard it is to walk a day in his shoes. It has backfired. Very few people will read this and feel sympathy for him. They might feel Pity, but not sympathy. As John said, if he had shut up, his private life would be private. This would not have been an issue. We would have still seen the courtside seats, but it would have just been a blurb on ESPN. We would not have a mental picture of a man throwing golf clubs and proud that he did not break any this time. This time? Which mean he normally does break golf clubs like his many phones when he gets mad. Not the level headedness that you need in a QB, especially a NFL QB.

the_voice
the_voice

Great talent who appears to be way more interested in personal fame and fun than maximizing the talent he was blessed with. It's all about him. It will be interesting to see how the mix of extraordinary talent and self-centered behavior translates in the NFL. 

He seems a perfect metaphor for 21st century America. What a waste. Kind of reminds me of James Dean. "Too fast to live, too young to die. bye, bye." 

HoustonVol
HoustonVol

I had also fully expected Manziel to be one of the current players joining the O'Bannon lawsuit. He and his family have the resources. Plus he is one of the biggest players right now not being able to capitalize on their image. If anyone is being finacially harmed by the NCAA rules it is him.

HoustonVol
HoustonVol

I read this article also. While I feel sorry for him, I don't feel sympathy for him. Most of this situation he brought upon himself. I read the parking ticket section. What his parents claim was harassment, I see a preferential treatment. If that had been my car parked illegally, I would have been ticketed and possibly towed, Not a knock on the door and given a chance to move it. Wow! Then all of the drinking. For a 19 and 20 year old. If this was an attempt by his manager and parents to create sympathy for him, it is backfiring. Right now winning is curing all ills. It is clear that JM cannot handle losing. What happens when they do? JM going to go off on a lineman that missed a block? JM and/or his parents start publicly criticizing Sumlin and the school. TAMU is about to experience a NASCAR restrictor plate wreck of a season.

Eagle78
Eagle78

In a way, I feel bad for Manziel.  


If any of us were under the microscope he has been under, we could be made to look bad.  Here is the thing:  all of us, every single one, has our shortcomings.  Manziel's situation now is akin to a kid going for a photo shoot, and the photographer wants all the shots to be close-ups of a zit or blackhead.  The media can make anyone look bad.  Conversely, they can make anyone look good if they want to.  You just have to look at presidential politics to see that that is the case.

Gamecock in ATL
Gamecock in ATL

Love the Garcia reference. Johnny Manziel is exactly what Garcia would have been if he was consistently good.

5LittlePiggies
5LittlePiggies

I read that story about an hour ago, and the 1st thing that came to my mind was the enabling parenting.  The writer made the comment that Johnny wants for nothing.  That to me said more about him than anything.  In the teaching profession I deal with kids whose parents are absent, and these kids have so many issues because of that.  The only type of kids I see with a lot of the same issues are kids who "want for nothing."  He's stinking 20-years-old and already has a drinking and anger problem.  I catch my kid with out partying and drinking it up in bars before they're 21 and no one will see them again until they're 21.  See my kid fling a golf club across the course while throwing the f-bomb, he better like the taste of soap, and forget coming to the country club for a while.  My kid tells his aunt to "shut the hell up" and they will have to pick him up off the floor.  This boy seemingly has gotten anything he has wanted (without working for it) and gotten away with anything he's done (without consequence).  I don't blame him for this.  I blame his parents.  It's called a gradual release.  He's been given a license to ill (for all you Beastie Boys fans out there).  But, Daddy loves him, so bring him another Crown and Sprite. 

John at MrSEC
John at MrSEC moderator

@MoKelly1 

I hope he is just as good on the field.  

But I don't grasp how anyone can read that ESPN piece without seeing any problems with a 20-year-old who drinks to relieve stress and who throws clubs across a golf course.  The young man gets little direction, it seems, and he's stressed to the gills by the scrutiny... that he brings on himself.  That's a pretty volatile mix.

In my view, that's more than just "words."  Somebody needs to help the kid.

Thanks for reading the site,

John

John at MrSEC
John at MrSEC moderator

@tbear57 

Here's the problem with the "media built him up and is tearing him back down" view -- that hasn't happened with AJ McCarron.  Or Jadeveon Clowney.  Or Tim Tebow.  

McCarron could be the first QB to win three BCS titles and he dates a beauty queen.  But he doesn't tweet and party and jetset like Manziel.

Clowney is an A-1 athletic freak who made the tackle of the year last season and is a Heisman candidate from the defensive side of the ball this season.  But he doesn't tweet and party and jetset like Manziel.

And if there was ever a player that the media would love to find dirt on it's Tebow.  But he flew down to Earth on wings with a harp.  Needless to say, he's never done the Twitter, boozing, rock star stuff that Manziel has.

To blame the media is to ignore the truest point in this whole saga -- Manziel has been his own worst enemy by living the celebrity lifestyle and stumbling while doing so.  When you say, "Look at me" you can't cry if everyone points and gawks when you trip and fall.

Thanks for reading,

John

the_voice
the_voice

@BonzaiB The Namath analogy is not bad, except I'm having difficulty seeing Bear Bryant allowing Namath to behave in such a bizarre way. Manziel has the talent to make any NFL coach get excited about the possibilities. But what owner/GM/coach combination would want to make him the face of their nearly $1 billion business enterprise? I'm certain a team desperate for publicity will take the risk, but what a colossal gamble. 

bigreb
bigreb

@Eagle78 Eagle, I don't think anyone would disagree with you about the power of the media. Assuming this is the case here and the media is out to get you, do you continue to go out and break the law with all the under age drinking, and then keep posting off the cuff, alcohol fueled rants on twitter for the world to see? This stubbornness that says, "I'm gonna do what I want to do, no matter what the heck anyone thinks about it, even though the media is out to get me" shows to me a dangerous disregard for authority if true. Nobody is so big that they don't have to answer to some authority. My father would quickly cut me down to size, and I'm 45 years old. I feel sorry for the Manziels because apparently they lost control of their son a long time ago, and they now have to play out this saga of not knowing what to do to try and get control of their son back, in front of the whole world. The only other option they have is to do what they are apparently now doing, placate him, make excuses for him, and take his side in every apparent misdeed.

 

John at MrSEC
John at MrSEC moderator

@Eagle78 

I, too, feel bad for Manziel.  But this is not just a case of the media making someone out to be a bad guy, anymore than the media set out to make Tim Tebow look like a good guy.  The media in both cases was feeding the people info about stars they were drawn to.  They were drawn to Tebow for his angelic persona.  They're drawn to Manziel because he's living the rock star lifestyle and he has tweeted about it to the point of gaining hundreds of thousands of followers.

As I've said before, I believe those closest to Manziel failed him by not taking away the one tool that has led to both his fame and all of the drawbacks that come with it -- Twitter.  Twitter made him bigger than a football player.  If he'd met LeBron James and Drake and no one knew about it, he wouldn't be a super-celeb.  But he showed all that stuff to America.  Everyone gawked.  And now the gawking has gotten under his skin.

That must be a terribly difficult lesson to learn at a young age.  Shoot, there's a reason so many child stars blow up as adults... they weren't ready for (cliche alert) "the price of fame."

Someone should have told Manziel months ago that he was not mature enough or he was too temperamental to use Twitter.  This past offseason would have been 1000x quieter AND less stressful for him if they'd only done so.

Thanks for reading,

John

John at MrSEC
John at MrSEC moderator

@Gamecock in ATL 

I was comparing two QBs who happened to make a lot of news off the field under AD Eric Hyman.  I wasn't trying to compare their talent levels... as they're worlds apart (as you pointed out).

Thanks for reading the site,

John

davdunn
davdunn

It appears that his parents love him and are trying to be there for him as a friend but seem to have forgotten that its their job to set boundaries and teach him how to deal with those boundaries.

John at MrSEC
John at MrSEC moderator

@5LittlePiggies 

You and I must've been raised in similar ways.  I agree with everything you wrote.  

Thanks for reading the site,

John

Tusk
Tusk

@the_voice @BonzaiB If I'm not mistaken, Coach Bryant suspended Namath during his junior season (including the Sugar Bowl).  When Namath returned for his senior season, he pretty much toed the line.  

BonzaiB
BonzaiB

@the_voice @BonzaiB All attempts to relate things back to a previous era beg the differences. When Bryant was coaching at Bama, for years he refused to recruit black players, there was no such thing as twitter, internet, cell phone cameras, and there was a much more circumspect press (Bryant drank quite a bit, routinely during radio interviews, and no one said a thing about it. What would happen today if that happened on ESPN?) which allowed that guys were going to be guys. 

NCAA rules today prohibit coaches from dealing with players during the off season. When people say "Bryant would have done things differently, or Sumlin, Muschamp, Miles, Franklin, et al, should control their players," remember the NCAA has draconian rules that limit the contact a coach, or any member of the school's athletic department, can have with a player in the off season. For most of Bryant's time, there were no such restrictions. Bryant coached during a time where a coach had many, many more options for influencing the behavior of a player. Today, a coach has a legal staff just to interpret the consequences of a phone call to a student with a, "knock it off for your own good," piece of advice during periods the NCAA says a coach cannot even have a casual conversation with a player if they meet at Walmart during the off season.

Its a different era. Manziel is the first Joe Namath type character we have seen in college ball for years, completely independent, a rich kid with amazing talent who does not need the scholarship, a partier, a bit of a loose canon, the Heisman winner, etc, and all this in the age of an exponential increase in social media and the technology that enables it. Watch for more of this, its gonna happen, Manziel is just the current lightening rod. And if Bryant was coaching today, he could not do a thing about it during the summer, and probably would not even attempt to. Remember, when it became necessary to recruit black players later on, Bryant simply said, "I was wrong, now we will recruit black players." Coaches adapt to win.

And football teams, like the New England Patriots, have a history of not only hiring one, but dozens of players with faces much worse than Manziel. Ever hear of Ben Roethlisberger? Multiple sexual assualt charges. Not partying, but MULTIPLE SEXUAL ASSAULT charges, battery, etc. And he is the face of a billion dollar franchise. Fans love him. Michael Vick? There are many others. The NFL averages over 1/3 of its players at one time or another charged with, or having been convicted of, felonies. The only thing that will limit Manziel's NFL chances are the evaluatioin of how he fits into a particular team's system (ala Tebow).

BonzaiB
BonzaiB

@Tusk @the_voice @BonzaiB You are absolutely correct, and Bryant, if he were alive and coaching today, would be able to do that again, as could Coach X, Y or Z.  But what I was talking about was the ability of a coach to do something about stupid, not illegal, behavior during the OFF season. Namath broke team rules during a season (nothing illegal) and was disciplined for it. Good call coach, but a player in the off season cannot be contacted by a coach and counseled about most of his behavior. I am sure that Namath was counseled by the Alabama staff during that time, so he understood why his behavior was not good for himself, the team or the institution. And to the institutions credit, the Bear's credit, and to Namath's credit, the counseling was effective enough it was taken to heart. That's mentoring at a very effective level.  

If a player commits a crime at anytime, he can be dismissed, etc., but what a lot of people seem to be saying is that somehow Sumlin and Co are negligent for not reigning Manziel in during the summer. The problem for Sumlin is there is not much he is ALLOWED to do by NCAA rules during the off season. He certainly could not have called Manziel in for a heart to heart after Cancun, the NCAA would have gone ape all over the A&M program.

So, my point was that under today's rules, coaches are not ALLOWED to mentor players like coaches could during Bryant's era, specifically in the off season. Now, is it possible for a team to come up with a code of conduct that impacts players at all times, even in the off season, that covers more than illegal activities? I have no idea, but it would be a stretch, I would think.

bigreb
bigreb

@BonzaiB @bigreb @the_voice Normally the ones who start name calling ie your  "sanctimonious tool" are the ones who wish to argue rather than discuss.

BonzaiB
BonzaiB

@the_voice @BonzaiB And I was not trying to project. I personally would not want a thug like Roethlisberger on my payroll, but it is what it is. I wish we could all go back to a time where things were not so elastic in our measurement of what is tolerable on the moral yardstick, but that train has left the station. I agree it is an absolutely different era. I would like to see the NCAA give coaches a bit more discression in doing those things that help a player develop as a person, as a recognition it is a different era, but that is not likely going to happen.

I saw an interview with Sumlin, where a reporter asked about regretts he had leaving Houston. He said something to the effect that the hardest thing he had to do was to talk to players who had been raised in foster homes, by single moms, etc, that he had recruited, that he was leaving. 

That made me think that in todays' world, with all that is changing, an increase in the tools mentors have with this kids is what might help the most, not a legalistic maze that prevents contact during the off season. Have no idea if that is just wishful thinking.

BonzaiB
BonzaiB

@bigreb @BonzaiB @the_voice Now you are just being rediculous, exagerating everything being said. If you're going to be a sanctimonious tool taking every thing written out of context so you can can argue rather thasn discuss, you are not worth the effort.

the_voice
the_voice

@BonzaiB @the_voice It is absolutely a different era. We've seen basketball evolve from a team game to a Sportscenter dunkathon because it's a different era. We've seen the evolution of the diva wide receiver because it's a different era. We've seen athletes convicted of horrendous things such as manslaughter given "second" chances because it's a different era. And, yes, we've seen the Vick and Roethlisberger given "second" chances at being the face of huge business enterprises because it's a different era. But remember, Vick and Roethlisberger had achieved at a very high level in the NFL before they got those "second" chances. Their ability to perform in the NFL at a high level was a known entity. Manziel doesn't have that advantage. You can project all you want, but any drafted quarterback is a gamble. Add that to an obvious level of immaturity and it will be a toxic combination at quarterback for many teams (see Tyler Bray, mid-round talent and undrafted due to immaturity).

Again, he'll have his chance with a team desperate for publicity (Jets or Cowboys, maybe). I selfishly hope he has the maturity to succeed in the NFL because I think he could recreate the position at that level. He also could be a coach/GM killer and be out of the league by 25. A fan can easily say it is worth the gamble. If my job or a significant part of my fortune was at risk, I think I would pass.

bigreb
bigreb

@BonzaiB @bigreb @the_voice "families are complex"? This is your attempt to say exonerate Manziel and his family? 

  Nobody here is saying Manziel is worse than Roethlisberger and his multiple sexual misconduct charges. Sorry you missed that.

What most are saying is that he is acting like a rich, spoiled punk and normal teams don't respond well as a team to rich, spoiled punks as their leaders. Normal parents that love their kids will try and discipline them and won't blindly defend them in the face of overwhelming evidence.

BonzaiB
BonzaiB

@bigreb @BonzaiB @the_voice You missed my point, I did not compare Manziel to Vick and company, rather that was in response to "no billion dollar enterprise would want someone like Manziel as its face." Not even close to comparing his behavior to anothers as a rationalization for conduct. Again, that point was about the behavior of NFL teams and their hiring practices, not Manziels. Sorry you missed that. And families are complex. I bet if I wandered through just about any modern family's internal workings (including yours), there would be a bunch of denials and blaming going on. And bringing Manson into this is just wierd.

bigreb
bigreb

@BonzaiB @the_voice Comparing him to Roethlisberger and Vick doesn't make how he is acting okay. No more than comparing Weiner from New York to Charles Manson would make his escapades okay.  Manziel is acting like a rich kid punk. His parents are now blaming the university of Texas A&M and saying they are just "selfish". At no time in all this have I heard them say anything about their child...and that is how Manziel is coming off, as a child.

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