Albama Arkansas Auburn Florida Georgia Kentucky LSU Mississippi State Missouri Ole-Miss USC Tennessee Texas A&M Vanderbilt
Latest News

Realignment-Followers Hold Their Breath As Blowback Increases Against Maryland’s Move

exploding-cigarWhen suddenly, almost out of nowhere Maryland announced last fall that it would be leaving the ACC for the Big Ten, college sports fans gasped.  Plenty of big name schools have changed affiliations over the past three or four years, yes, but none had done so quite as unexpectedly as Maryland.

The Terrapins — members of the seemingly stable ACC since 1953 — were striking out on their own to join what had always been perceived as a Midwestern conference.  And it happened just when expansion and realignment stories appeared to be slowing down, giving way to talk of a new college football playoff.

Since Maryland’s announcement, rumors have since swirled of further ACC defections.  To the Big Ten.  To the Big XII.  And to the SEC.

Yet Maryland’s move is being held up in court by the Atlantic Coast Conference.  Last month the league’s lawsuit demanding a $52 million exit fee was upheld by a North Carolina judge.  As things continue to play out in the courtroom, the court of public opinion is weighing in on the situation, too.  Maryland hasn’t been winning in that court either.

At issue is the school’s rushed decision to jump conferences.  School president Wallace Loh has said the move needed to be fast and quiet due to to a non-disclosure agreement Maryland entered into with the Big Ten.  Critics like former Terp athlete and Maryland congressman Thomas McMillen have said it was all too fast and too quiet.  McMillen wrote in November:

 

“(A) change of this magnitude should not be made over a weekend, with minimal documentation, little transparency and no input from anyone who might be opposed to it… Public universities receiving taxpayer money are supposed to operate under shared governance, but what happened at Maryland was governance by secrecy and exclusion.”

 

How much secrecy?  The Washington Post recently asked the school for a copy of its contract with the Big Ten.  The school said it didn’t keep one.  Asked then for a copy of the information the school provided board members as they made their Big Ten decision, the school again balked.  According to McMillen it was a “single piece of paper outlining the proposal, and it was taken away” at the end of the group’s meeting last November.

Now Maryland faces a lawsuit that was not thrown out by the first judge to hear it as well as internal friction over how quickly the move was planned and announced.  Could it be that Maryland’s exit from the ACC will finally be the one that slows the current expansion/realignment boom?  After all, in other recent high-profile moves the threat of lawsuit has usually given way rather quickly to a renegotiated exit fee.  And most schools have managed to put forth a “we’re all on the same page” spin even when there have been snubbed toes and hurt feelings behind university walls.  At Maryland, there seems to be a bigger internal rift than we’ve seen in past realignment cases.

In the end, the Terrapins will wind up in the Big Ten with Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Iowa.  But that move could be so slow and so painful — in terms of exit fees and smeared reputation — that other schools might not be so quick to switch conferences moving forward.

Heck, some schools might even take a whole week to mull such decisions.

For now, all eyes remain on Maryland.  Until the Terps manage to free themselves from the Atlantic Coast Conference, don’t count on any other major dominoes to fall.

 


31 comments
bill simmons
bill simmons

maybe the Big Ten wanted to add Maryland and Rutgers because *gasps* they are two great schools that have a lot in common with the other Big Ten schools... maybe just maybe *gasps* these moves have nothing to do with foosball, track or BTN profits 

jae1837
jae1837

Great article and the discussion on this subject is really great.  I'm a VT alum (so you know where I'm coming from) and here are my two cents:

 

1)  If Maryland wishes to leave the conference, that is great, but as the reporting in the Washington Post shows, Loh was already looking to have MD leave the ACC for the B1G before the addition of ND and the resultant rise in the exit fee.  If he felt that strongly on the subject, then inform the ACC they are leaving and avoid the whole hassle of the lawsuit over the new exit fee to begin with.

 

2)  I will not link to the article out of respect for Mr. SEC, but The Sports Business Journal wrote an article, called Fear the Deficit, about Maryland's move to the B1G in which the author states that Loh was not completely honest in his economic analysis that he used to justify the move from the ACC to B1G:

 

"When the athletic department cut those seven sports this year, its projections showed total deficits climbing as high as $17 million in 2017 if the department didn’t act. What was missing from those projections, however, was the new revenue that would come from the ACC’s 15-year, $3.6 billion TV deal with ESPN, which was renegotiated after Syracuse and Pittsburgh were added. Nor did the department have the information on new revenue that would come from the college football playoff."

 

Now the article states explicitly that B1G will distribute more revenue than the ACC.  There is no argument nor disagreement about that point.  The article just states that the need was not as urgent as Loh presented.  Loh had an agenda and he pursued it relentlessly.

 

3)  ESPN will increase its media deal with the ACC with the addition of ND.  Even though it is only 5 Football games, basketball and all the Olympic sports, the general consensus among the various articles I've read is that this will translate into another $2 -$3 million for the ACC just by adding ND to the ACC.  Also, just my humble opinion, ESPN will overpay to keep the ACC together.  Now I am not saying this will be equal to what SEC or B1G is projected to make in their new revenue deal, but my guess is that it will be on par with the Big-12 and their deal (including what each school gets for their 3rd tier rights).  Again, this last part of this point is just my opinion.

 

4)  The O'bannon lawsuit against the NCAA is a wild card.  Also, I agree with some of the posters on here that there is a bubble in the revenue being thrown for at the sports channel for live college sports.  The numbers that are being thrown about concerning the new B1G deal, btw are all assumptions, and the SEC deal are astronomical.  My current cable bill for verizon fios is already high.  High enough that I am actively looking for alternatives that will allow me to cut the cord.  The anticipated increase of my bill due to Maryland moving into the realm of B1G is the final straw.  

 

5)  I consider the way that the BTN generates its revenue a stealth tax that is making me very angry.  I did not go to a B1G school.  Why should the BTN get more money from me, via increase carriage fee that will be transferred to me in the form of a higher cable bill, just because Maryland is joining their athletic conference?  I do not watch the BTN nor do I intend to watch that channel in the future.  If the B1G schools are in that desperate need of money, then let them pass a tax in their states to support their schools!  I will not pay that money.  I work very hard for my earnings and I resent that someone sneaks their hands into my pockets for their needs.  

AndrewMartin
AndrewMartin

I wonder why some at Maryland and the ACC feel like Maryland's decision was secretive and not transparent, but their additions of Pitt and Syracuse out of the blue was not? Sounds like the "kettle is black" to me and very hypocritical.

JRsec
JRsec

There are several odd and random messages here.

1.  If you want to protect your schools from moves to other conferences then discourage them from hiring presidents and upper administration that have major ties to competitor conferences.  That will only make it tougher for competitors to gain traction.

2.  The Federal Government of today protects those who pay them the most.  As long as the cable networks line their pockets there will be no major shift in the way we do business.  Especially now that cable models are tied to teacher's retirement pay in many key states.

3.  What they need to fear is the destruction of the grass roots ability to pay for services.  I know we are still riding the crest of sports popularity from a contract standpoint, but demographics indicate a major shift away from as much of a sports centered culture in the coming years.  All indications are that people from the Boomer and X'er's generations are beginning to prefer HD TV to the stadium hassle, and that generation Y has a tough time affording the tickets, and that the subsequent generations who are in High School now show little enthusiasm for traditional sports.  Basketball and Baseball have already taken hits and in this demographic football does as well.  Now whether that is like the decline we saw twenty years ago in hunting and fishing as a participation activity where the decline was more tied to the availability of public access to land and water upon which to hunt and fish, meaning the decline of those resources coupled with economics, or is simply a lifestyle choice remains to be seen.  I tend to think that football is too expensive for many young boys to play today.  Equipment costs, medical risks, and time investment are just too much for many families to afford either monetarily or commitment wise.  I think football is peaking, and while it will not suffer the extent of decline that baseball and basketball are experiencing I think it could easily return to 1960's levels of popularity within two decades.  Since we sign contracts for 15 years this will prove to be a problem in the not too distant future.  If they want to complete realignment and a breakaway from the NCAA to maximize profits in all  sports they better do it sooner rather than later.  The immediacy of the financial advantage to do so won't be there in the not too distant future.

4.  In the end this realignment will have more to do with which institutions of higher learning are set aside and protected from a major downturn in the State and Federal funding of higher education than it has to do with sports.  Corporate television contracts will ultimately act as an umbrella for them when the economic storm and technological shifts that are brewing hit higher education.  Higher Education has been a Boomer driven bubble as well.  Future generations are already weighing cost versus advantage when it comes to higher education.  Automation is decreasing worker value.  Over population is another destructive ingredient to wage power.  And the types of jobs that are financially rewarding are becoming more specified and limited.   Therefore broad based educations, while personally valuable, are not necessarily rewarding in the market place.  It's a perfect storm for the ultimate culling of universities and colleges.  Those with other than federal and state funding (corporate funding to be precise) will survive.   

DaveinExile
DaveinExile

I think these new conferences are built on assumptions about consumer media behavior and media business models which are not going to be sustainable in the long term. I've backed down to an HDTV antenna and a wireless plan. I'm one of those people who horded Sports Illustrated magazines in boxes in the attics as a kid and kept an extra remote in the closet in case I broke one over a bad call. I have 2 kids who love nothing better than going to Chapel Hill for a weekend, especially if a game is involved. But we watch 4 or 5 games a year, football and basketball, on TV. I can afford Uverse's 500 channels - I just find it an exceptionally poor value for the money.

 

This is beginning to feel like the housing bubble to me. Spare me the lectures about classic economic definitions of market behaviors necessary to meet the discipline's formal criteria. When I see this many assumptions being made about future revenues, and the size of the decisions being driven by those assumptions, I call that a bubble. I'd love to figure out how to sell Delany short on this one.

Dan Ramsey
Dan Ramsey

Wait until the first cable or satellite TV provider decides to go to an "a la carte" programming model as opposed to the current "package" model where subscribers are forced to pay for a channel regardless of whether or not they ever watch it or not. When that happens ... and it will because it's what consumers want ... the The Big 10 Network's revenues are going to fall off a cliff and the leagues presidents are going to realize that Jim Delany talked them into massively watering down their product by adding two schools like Maryland and Rutgers.

BonzaiB
BonzaiB

While I cannot think of a time I was even remotely interested in the outcome of a Maryland game (I know, there probably are one or two out there, I just can't think of a single one right now), the most interesting point to me in the write up is not the money, its not the history Maryland has or has not with anyone, its that this has the stain of secrecy all over it. And INSIDERS (read that power brokers, boosters, members of governing and oversight bodies, and other state officials responsible for funding, institutions that hold loans taken based on EXPECTED revenues in, etc, etc, etc) get REALLY po'd when they are not consulted about a major move at a college or university. The reason they became insiders (and it takes a lot of work, manuevering, maybe money and politicing to get to be an insider at most places) is to have some say it what happens, to shape an institutions future. Maryland is in the epicenter of the political universe for the US. Politics is the god that is worshiped in that part of the country. I lived there, and a political slight NEVER gets forgiven. And it looks like Loh may have stepped on more than one political big toe. Not good.

 

President Loh may have crossed a threshold here if this was done with out full consultations all the way around. Arkansas, South Carolina, Texas A&M, Nebraska and Missouri's leadership did not bolt to new conferences in that kind of secrecy. All of those institutions did their homework, and consulted the right people. When they all left for their new home, there was basic eurphoria from at least four of those fan bases (not up on what happened with USC's fan base, but do not remember stories of bad blood). These guys worked their internals first. 

 

Four of those schools had someting in common that made their leaderships propoganda wars go smoother than you expect with Maryland..... they all hated a domineering, common foe, Texas. Getting away from them seems to make folks very happy, so how can you lose that ad campaign? Maryland has a problem with..... who? Who do the Terps feel overshadows them? Whose fan base has more privaleges, what school makes tons more money, what school drives the train in the ACC... FSU? I have never heard anything like that, but ..... I've been wrong before.

 

From what I make of this is Loh is in real big trouble. $52 million is a boat load of cash for a college program to pay out, and the Big 10 is not going to make it rain cash overnight. And the fans get what for all of this? You better believe if Maryland loses this suit, ticket prices will rise at right about the same time as tempers. If I was a Terp, I'd be po'd. And no one from the inside who was left outside on this is going to try to spin this one in Loh's favor. The history of the suggests demands for a head are more likely.

I4Bama
I4Bama

That looks like Kathleen Turner in the picture, but it is not, is it?  Where do you get those?  I am not well versed on her filmography.  If it is a movie, it is not leaping to mind.  No, I don't think it is her.

Roggespierre
Roggespierre

It makes perfect sense that the Maryland move would be controversial internally.  This isn't a former SWC expat looking to trade up or to get away from the outsize influence of the University of Texas.  It isn't a late 1970s Eastern Independent that has switched leagues on multiple occasions after the Supreme Court Oklahoma/NCAA decision.  Maryland a founding member of a power conference.  A move of this magnitude is unprecedented.  More importantly, the ACC needs to win the lawsuit - or at least make it very expensive for Maryland to leave - if it is to remain a power conference.

 

Maryland insiders are accustomed to the traditions of the ACC.  Understandably, they like those traditions.  They will miss their (almost) annual home basketball games with Duke and North Carolina.  They don't yet understand what the Big Ten has to offer because they aren't yet in it.  Their feeling is one of loss.  Never mind the unprecedented excitement that will visit Byrd Stadium when Penn State, Ohio State and Michigan come to College Park on fall Saturday afternoons.  Maryland insiders are not thinking about that.  As a basketball-oriented school, they also resent that their favorite sport is not nearly as important as football.  As a native of basketball-crazy Indiana, I understand.

 

McMillan is a very smart and accomplished guy.  As a Big Ten fan, I would prefer that he stand down.  Generally, people tend to challenge process only when they do not like the outcome.  If the same lack of documentation had led to Maryland remaining in the ACC and irresponsibly passing up the revenue that the Big Ten had to offer, I doubt that McMillan and others would have said anything.  The process would have been every bit as untoward, if not more so, but the Maryland insiders would have liked the outcome.  Nothing would have happened.

DanHogan
DanHogan

The implication that this move was done in a weekend isn't right.  It took a number of weeks and was done in secrecy because of the mess that the Big Ten's expansion efforts caused a few years earlier.

 

For those who didn't see the article at the time, WashPo covered the topic quite a bit here.

http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2012-12-11/sports/35767358_1_president-wallace-d-loh-college-athletics-acc-commissioner 

 

The fact that Maryland doesn't have a copy of the agreed contract after the fact is really...  odd.  Is it not public leading to UMd covering it up?

DanHogan
DanHogan

 @AndrewMartin  John's point with the post was that the blow-back from Maryland's move has been much more than other moves.  We're not reading complaints former athletes or  board members from former Big East schools (no big surprise there) or Colorado or Nebraska.  For those who think UVA/UNC/FSU/Clemson are about to jump, those presidents and board members are watching what is happening at Maryland and wondering if the same thing could happen to them. John's point isn't what they are complaining about -- it's the fact that they are complaining. 

 

Still, though.  Reading this, I couldn't help but wonder what the process was like for the other schools that moved.  Were the boards forced to make these decisions in a weekend?  Were they provided one page of info that was taken away after the meeting?  Do those schools have copies of the contracts they signed?

ezgame
ezgame

 @JRsec I don't know...

1.  In today's world top officials move around.  They rise & fall due to support by the regents, staff, and their accomplishments.  Some think (like me) that Loh is very talented & great at his job.  He stepped into MD hoping to fix the issues ($ xx Million in dept).  Due to lack of public support, Loh & Anderson had to temporary decline MD funding of 7 varsity sports.  IMO, Loh wanted the Athletic Department to be self-suffiant, and their current revenue model was not or could not reduce the AD dept quickly enough.

 - Some might say bring that concern to the public, and let them further support those sports via fund raisers & what-not.  Loh did.  That's why one varsity sport was saved, because it generated enough money to keep going for 1 more year.  The others didn't.

 - Some might say raise gate costs, and let the events pay or reduce the dept.  I think Loh did that too?  But now attendance was dropping, and the money maker (ie football) had empty seats & skyboxes.

 - Some might say just dip into the schools tuition fund, have the students foot the bill.  Not sure here, but I think the students already were concerned about sponsoring or supplimenting varsity sports.  I think Loh did not do this?

 - Some might say Loh should've pimped out the varsity sports naming rights to corporations and advertisement groups.  I think Loh did that to temporary stop the bleeding, but it still wasn't enought.

 - If all else fails...  Look for a larger payday, somewhere?  Loh did that by agreeing to join the Big10.  This last resort is what I think fans are upset with...  IMO, MD fans might feel resentment for having to turn to another conference for help, because their current predicament isn't being solved by conventional methods?  Those fans blame Loh (right or wrong).  They weren't unhappy with the ACC, they were broke.

.

IMO, it wasn't Loh's fault.  He did what had to be done.  Had nothing to do with his roots?  IMO, it was the right thing to do to wipe the slate clean.  Other Presidents & AD's who face similar issues, may not be so lucky?  I hope their heritage doesn't stop them from doing what's best for their Universities.

Roggespierre
Roggespierre

 @DaveinExile Of course you're right.  History proves it.  Broadcast television networks were once a license to print money.  Local television stations were the only options.  Broadcast radio stations were worth a lot.  SI and Time magazines were dominant.  Local newspaper publishers had to build bigger rooms so they could stash all of the money.

 

None of that is true today.  Were those all bubbles?  If we go with your definition - and I'm fine with that - then we must conclude that they were.  But isn't that the case with just about everything? 

 

The market is unpredictable.  Many believed that the internet would put paper mills out of business.  Instead, it created a boom culture for paper producers because consumers printed more documents than ever before.  Newspapers were supposed to be immune to internet competitors because they had a monopoly on local print coverage.  But it didn't exactly work out that way.

 

Reasonable financial projections are based on assumed and historic revenue growth.  That's really all anyone has to go on.  Billions are traded on Wall Street every day based on nothing more than that.  And, yes, sometimes they go bust.

 

Delany is making the best possible use of the market that exists today.  He innovated with the BTN and created a model that others are now feverishly attempting to copy.  He might not be they guy you want at your dinner party, but he seems to know how to do his job.

 

And when the market shifts, my guess is that he'll either be prepared or dead.  If it's the latter, then the B1G had better have a strong successor in place.

Roggespierre
Roggespierre

 @Dan Ramsey They won't because they'll lose money.  The only way that happens - and it is possible - is if they're forced to do it by either the government or a new competitor.  The latter, via digital a la carte over the internet, seems very likely at some point.

I4Bama
I4Bama

 @BonzaiB

 Unless you watched the game where they wore the uniforms that looked like the Maryland flag exploded on them just out of morbid uniform curiosity.

I4Bama
I4Bama

 @BonzaiB

 Frank Reich and the comeback against Miami.

John at MrSEC
John at MrSEC moderator

 @I4Bama 

 

That's an actress named Olivia Wilde from a photoshoot.

 

Thanks for reading the site,

John

Dan Ramsey
Dan Ramsey

 @Roggespierre    LOL!!!!  That's utterly ridiculous.  The ACC came out WAAAAAAAY ahead when it traded Louisville for Maryland. The ACC is also adding Syracuse, Pitt and Notre Dame in 2014.  To suggest that the ACC will lose it's status as a power conference if Maryland leaves is patently absurd.  The ACC isn't going anywhere.  In fact, the ACC has, by a fairly significant margin, the largest TV footprint of any conference in the country. 

ezgame
ezgame

 @Roggespierre Good points, I agree with most...  for discussion's sake, here's my thoughts? 

.

More importantly, the ACC needs to win the lawsuit - or at least make it very expensive for Maryland to leave - if it is to remain a power conference.

 - Why?  Why must money equate to remaining a power conference?  Even if the ACC gets all $52M and some more, is the public preception or pier conference perception changed (maybe even improved)?  IMO, I don't think pier conferences really care, just as long as their Universities get paid similar amounts/TV revenues.  Since "power" is now typically inferring to collective athletic $$$ & TV contracts.

.

Maryland insiders are accustomed to the traditions of the ACC...  They will miss their (almost) annual home basketball games with Duke and North Carolina.

 - From what I've read, it sounded like MD didn't have a natural rival within the ACC (to be fair, they may not have one in Big10 either)?  Even coach K said Dook didn't believe MD was their rival, and he was disappointed in MD leaving.  Not because of their matches, but because of public perceptions turning against the ACC, and possibly mislabling the ACC as "weak" compared to other conferences?

.

As a basketball-oriented school, they also resent that their favorite sport is not nearly as important as football.

- I understand that football drives the bus.  But why is it that if an University excells in basketball or lacrosse or baseball, they feel unwelcomed or unworthy?  Isn't it better to be accepted as is.  IMO, I think many lose sight of the benefits other sports provide, even title IX?  I'm not a fan of putting all your eggs in one basket?  I understand milking rabib fans for contributions in sports that have massive followings, and capitalizing on that to ensure your athletic department is profitable.  But if another sport becomes the next big thing, and MD sponsors it... Isn't that an overall good thing?

.

McMillan is a very smart and accomplished guy....  Generally, people tend to challenge process only when they do not like the outcome.

 - IM(mostHumble)O...  I think McMillian is playing the political game?  I feel he's posturing himself to be considered a "big-wig" within the MD school system & regents.  That's why he's making such a fuss, because he was NOT part of the "in-crowd" early discussions.  He felt left out, and is now trying to gain support (via mutany style).  All his arguments boil down to, "I don't like this or that".  So I'm going to smear my own University to get what I want (boo-hoo).  Even if his points are valid... He sure isn't helping anything, and instead seems to revel in stirring the emotionally filled, MD pot?  Again, IM(mostHumble)O can't he work with Loh and MD behind closed doors?  Does the MD public need to know, during a bathroom break Loh & Anderson discussed a coaches salary vs wins?  I'm not suggesting blindly following top officials decisions.  I just think there could've been a better way of voicing concern... like maybe a blog :)

John at MrSEC
John at MrSEC moderator

 @DanHogan 

 

According to the University of Maryland-connected people who are upset about this, the main board had a weekend to rubber stamp the deal.  Even the story you linked to -- which drives people away from this site, thank you -- references a group of seven people total making a final decision before a football game.  Jim Delany had wooed Maryland's president a select few.  And that's what has a number of Maryland backers upset.  As was stated in the above post.

 

John

jae1837
jae1837

 @ezgame  @JRsec 

 

I respectfully disagree.  Google "Fear the Deficiet" by the Sports Business Journal from December 2012.  I have the relevant quote from the article in my comment above if you want to save yourself the trouble.

DaveinExile
DaveinExile

 @Roggespierre And of course you're right. People do trade billions based on the available data, and as a result, billions change hands in unexpected ways. Industries do evolve over time, and consumer behaviors are not predictable. I just think Delany is making the same sort of qualitative assumptions about growth relative to subscriber cable that telecoms made about the demand for bandwidth, for example. Telecoms and energy companies were considered the safest of investments just before they went bust - but they went bust in part because they all went mad trying to secure future market share from other industry competitors, investing too much and expanding too rapidly.

 

People can find parallels in anything and everything. It's not that difficult. Maryland was the point for me where I stopped ignoring those parallels as random noise. It could be that the death of the ACC and Big East make these moves worth it for Delany regardless of where subscriber cable heads from here. Who knows? But I am betting against Delany on this one, and I think we'll see the results during his tenure as conference commissioner.

AllTideUp
AllTideUp

 @Roggespierre  @DaveinExile 

Some people think we will have an a la carte model coming.  I doubt it though.  These things are federally regulated and federal regulations tend to grow larger with time rather than shrinking.

 

My bet on what would really change the market is a new delivery system.  When entrepreneurs or companies want to make money, the best way to deal with hindering regulations is to bypass them.  New technologies will do that in the same way the internet bypasses the FCC.  Which brings me to my prediction.  The internet as a platform hasn't been fully utilized yet.  With every passing year though, there are more ways to consume TV shows online.  ESPN is now experimenting with their WatchESPN feature and I think that sort of thing will only expand in the future.  I would think cable networks or other enterprising media companies will launch online networks to deliver their content that way.  It's almost too easy to be overlooked.  It may never fully replace standard TV, but it will probably cut down on cable and satellite subscriptions.

AllTideUp
AllTideUp

 @Dan Ramsey  @Roggespierre 

The ACC has the largest TV footprint in the nation?  Yes, but why do they have the worst TV contract of the 5 power leagues?  The ACC is weak.  That's why Maryland is leaving.  Schools don't leave power conferences unless something is incredibly wrong.  Losing Maryland is only the beginning.  There will be several more and the ACC will be just like the old Big East.

Roggespierre
Roggespierre

 @Dan Ramsey Okay.  I''m sure the ACC is on fine footing.  Coach K clearly had it wrong when he said that the conference is "vulnerable".  What would  he know?

 

And you seem to purposely misrepresent my statement about the ACC being a power conference.  Maryland has nothing to do with it.  But there is a reason that Maryland is moving to the Big Ten regardless of whether or not it has to pay a $52 million exit fee.  There is a reason that the ACC set that fee so high.  Could it be fear of losing more members?  Nah, of course not.

 

Clearly, Florida State AD Spetman is publicly talking about how nice it would be to get an invite from the SEC because he absolutely loves what he has in the ACC.

 

Any conference that accommodates Notre Dame's football independence must be strong, right.  Look at how it helped the Big East.

 

LOL! Indeed!  Go ACC!

Roggespierre
Roggespierre

 @ezgame Obviously, these are my own opinion, nothing more and nothing less.  But I'll try to answer your questions as well as I can.

 

When I talk about power conferences, I'm talking about money.  So, too, is just about everyone else, I think.  Public perception is nice, but it doesn't fund athletic departments.  Maryland is leaving the ACC and joining the Big Ten exactly because its athletic department is desperate for money.  The previous administration spent tens of millions on amenities that it Maryland was unable to sell.  You should see all of the empty club seats and sky boxes at Byrd Stadium on Saturday afternoons.  In the future, they will be filled - by Ohio State, Michigan, Michigan State and Penn State fans.

 

More to the point, others that might be considering the ACC will do so only if it is obvious that moving is in their best interest from a financial perspective.  The BTN and the upcoming SEC Network are going to give those conferences a huge advantage on the ACC with regards to media rights revenue.  The Big Ten will soon auction off its tier 1 and tier 2 football and basketball rights.  It'll be the last major conference to do so.  The B1G is going to be very, very rich.  The SEC is going to be very, very rich.  The Big 12 and Pac-12 are already reasonably rich.  The ACC is going to fall behind unless it can convince ESPN to renegotiate it distribution rights.  Why would ESPN do that?

 

Maryland does not have a natural rival in the ACC, but just try to tell that to Terps fans.  Many of them fully believe that Duke and Carolina are their top rivals.  They don't seem to understand that the hatred is not reciprocal and that Duke and Carolina fans would rate Maryland among the middle tier of their ACC rivals, or at least somewhere after each other and NC State.

 

As a Purdue fan, I get this.  The Boiler faithful consider Notre Dame their 2nd biggest rival after Indiana.  Does Notre Dame feel that way?  Of course not.  It's much more interested in USC, Stanford, and Navy.  Notre Dame has publicly made it clear that it values those rivalries more than its Midwestern rivalries.  Does that change anything for Purdue fans?  Not at all.

 

McMillan's ego was definitely bruised.  But he wasn't alone.  He couldn't have been happy to learn that Under Armour founder Kevin Plank was consulted from Day 1 while he was kept in the dark.  McMillan doesn't  think he's smearing the university; he's smearing the President Loh.  If the latter walks away from this with his job, then he will have really accomplished something.

DanHogan
DanHogan

 @John at MrSEC First of all, I have no intention of driving traffic away from your site.  You have very knowledgeable readers here (because they read this site) and the few of them who hadn't read that WashPo article I'm sure clicked on it -- saw it open in a separate window/tab -- and debated reading it later. 

 

At any rate..  So the difference here isn't the fact that the deal was done in a weekend -- the process did go on for a few months and involved the AD and the chancellor from the get-go. And from there, there was a small inner circle in addition to the first level of Loh's administration who were involved within a week of the first discussions.  It's the Board of Regents, who I have to wonder might be the most likely to be a one of those leaks that both Loh and Delany felt could sabotage the deal, that wasn't included until that last weekend when it was discussed and approved.  (It is interesting to note that while rumors circulated in other places, the first real ESPN-quality rumors came out that Saturday in relatively close proximity to the regents meetings.  Were they the last leak that made ESPN confident there was something there?)  It was this group that had a single piece of paper that was taken away after the meeting I presume. 

 

The real question for me is how to juggle the need for these discussions to be secluded -- something that just about everyone at the top-line at conferences and schools states is really needed -- and for the discussions with regents to be long enough with enough depth for them to make the final decision.

John at MrSEC
John at MrSEC moderator

 @Roggespierre  @DanHogan 

 

Our company just signed a non-disclosure agreement this week.  We fully understand that angle.  The hush-hush nature of the Maryland story is not surprising.

 

The fact that there has been more internal groaning over this move than most others is the key.  Maryland is getting more blowback from its own people, at least publicly, than any other major school that's moved in recent memory.

 

John

Roggespierre
Roggespierre

 @DanHogan  @John at MrSEC Yes, and this is not at all unusual in the corporate takeover world.  Non-disclosure agreements are the norm.  Boards are often given a 30 minute presentation along with an ultimatum.  If you can't handle it, then you have no business being on the Board.  Hey, that's life in the Big Ten (pun intended).

 

The democratic deliberative process isn't designed to prevent leaks.  In addition, the Board could have voted no and/or asked for more time - a request that likely and rightly would have been denied by Delany.

 

It did neither.

ezgame
ezgame

 @DanHogan  @John at MrSEC    like for CONSPIRACY !

"who I have to wonder might be the most likely to be a one of those leaks that both Loh and Delany felt could sabotage the deal,"

 - good one :)

Trackbacks

  1. Title

    [...]usually posts some extremely intriguing stuff like this. If you are new to this site[...]

  2. well nanoo says:

    well nanoo

    This made me chuckle for a long time.

  3. christian louboutin boots 2013

    Med sikte på å gjenopprette USAs tradisjonelle verdier, som inkluderte sannhet og ære. Man trengte bare å se på bilder / videoer av christian louboutin red soles rallyet for å se at det var stor. The Mall ble bokstavelig t…

  4. spirits and productivity. on the other hand

    if you maintain a high level of enthusiasm, it will be easier to work through periods of disappointment. by maintaining this consistent level of effort and productivity you site will only grow in popularity!efforts are enduringby and large those bloggi…

  5. Title

    [...]usually posts some pretty fascinating stuff like this. If you’re new to this site[...]

  6. Title

    [...]Sites of interest we have a link to[...]

  7. Title

    [...]Sites of interest we have a link to[...]

  8. Title

    [...]please pay a visit to the sites we adhere to, including this a single, because it represents our picks from the web[...]

  9. Title

    [...]Here is a superb Blog You might Obtain Fascinating that we Encourage You[...]

  10. Title

    [...]very handful of sites that happen to become comprehensive beneath, from our point of view are undoubtedly well worth checking out[...]

  11. Title

    [...]Wonderful story, reckoned we could combine several unrelated information, nonetheless seriously worth taking a search, whoa did 1 understand about Mid East has got much more problerms at the same time [...]

  12. Title

    [...]we came across a cool website that you just might enjoy. Take a look if you want[...]

  13. Title

    [...]Here is a great Blog You may Discover Interesting that we Encourage You[...]

  14. Title

    [...]Here are a number of the web-sites we advise for our visitors[...]

  15. Title

    [...]The information and facts talked about in the post are some of the best offered [...]

  16. Title

    [...]Wonderful story, reckoned we could combine several unrelated information, nonetheless genuinely worth taking a look, whoa did one particular learn about Mid East has got a lot more problerms at the same time [...]

  17. Title

    [...]here are some hyperlinks to sites that we link to mainly because we feel they are worth visiting[...]

  18. Title

    [...]although web-sites we backlink to below are considerably not related to ours, we feel they’re actually really worth a go through, so possess a look[...]



Follow Us On:
Mobile MrSEC