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SEC Stat Analysis: Quick Sand

Yesterday morning we showed you a stat we call Quick Strike.  It’s a simple measure of points-per-offensive-plays-run that shows us which SEC teams score with the greatest ease. 

Today, we bring you the opposite measurement.  We call it Quick Sand.  It’s designed to show you which SEC defense force opponents to run the most plays in order to put points on the scoreboard.

As was the case with our Quick Strike numbers, this is a team measure.  We include all points allowed by a team (including on special teams and via turnover returns) and then divide that figure by the total number of defensive plays run.

Bad special teams play and bad offense can obviously impact the yardage a team has to defend and the number of points a team will give up.

Below are the numbers from across the SEC.


Quick Sand (Points-Allowed-Per-Play in SEC contests only)

School
SEC Record
Points Allowed
Defensive Plays
Points Allowed Per Play
LSU
6-0
47
338
.139
Alabama
6-1
53
373
.142
S. Carolina
6-2
135
516
.261
Georgia
6-1
135
424
.318
Miss. State
1-5
138
418
.330
Arkansas
5-1
139
417
.333
Vanderbilt
2-5
160
475
.336
Florida
3-5
191
548
.348
Auburn
4-3
204
480
.425
Tennessee
0-6
191
389
.491
Kentucky
1-5
216
426
.506
Ole Miss
0-6
209
409
.511



Observations:

* The top six teams in our Quick Sand rating have a combined SEC record of 30-10.  The teams on the bottom half our table are 10-30.  You do the math.

* It’s remarkable that LSU and Alabama — through a combined 13 conference games played — are still so close defensively.  Each play their opponents run is worth less than 15% of a single point.  That’s “all-time” type good.

* On the other end of the spectrum, each play a team runs against Kentucky or Ole Miss is worth more than half a point on the scoreboard.  Hard to win games — regardless of what your offense is doing — when your defense is giving up points by the bushel barrel.

* MSU’s defensive performance — combined with its overall SEC record — shows that Dan Mullen’s problem isn’t on defense, it’s with his own offense.  More and more it’s looking like the offense Urban Meyer brought from Utah (and Mullen then took to Starkville) requires either a suffocating defense to go with it or a hall-of-famer at quarterback to run it if it’s going to reach top o’ the conference heights.

* How ’bout Arkansas’ defense?  They aren’t known for being particularly wicked, but the Razorbacks don’t surrender points easily.  Willy Robinson’s squad might not be flashy, but they’re getting the job done.  Of course, having an offense that gets ahead and consistently makes opponents one-dimensional helps, too.

 


4 comments
JohnCoz
JohnCoz

Meyers offense needs a suffocating defense or HOF QB running it to get to the top of the conference? As opposed to Sabans or Miles offense which does not require a suffocating defense to top the conference? Please, what weak reasoning. It takes a great team to top the conference, that is all. The foolish focus on one particular offense is simply short sighted and lacking substance.

Rob
Rob

Good point about Urban Meyer's offense. That has been my opinion for 2-3 three years now. Not knocking Meyer, because he's obviously a good coach, but maybe not as good as some think.

While our defense at Arkansas hasn't been as good as we thought it would be, it's not as bad as everyone thinks. Many fellow Arkansas fans would disagree with me, but I've actually said this about our last 3 defenses. In fact, our defense has even won games for us a few times over the past 2 seasons, but everyone always ignores it when it happens. Also, I'm not sure if it's fair to say that our offense "gets ahead and consistently makes opponents one-dimensional", when so much time has been spent criticizing Arkansas for having so many second half comebacks,

bert1959
bert1959

Am I correct with the following?

1. It is Mullen's offense, but I believe the offensive coordinator was calling the plays until after the UAB game. Things have opened up a little since then.

2. Was the MSU offensive coordinator part of Mike Shula's offensive staff when Alabama had no offense?

johnmrsec
johnmrsec

bert1959...

I'd have to do some digging on MSU's post-UAB numbers, but Les Koenning was at Alabama in 2001 and 2002 under Dennis Franchione. The Tide had winning records both years.

Thanks for reading,
John



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