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Full Text Of Accidental SEC Website Release

To be honest, we didn’t feel like copying and pasting all this stuff at 1am… so we’re doing so now.

Below is the information that was posted at SECSports.com last night:

 

Tiger Tracks: Missouri Joins The SEC

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – Given the ever-changing conference paradigm over the past year, the Southeastern Conference has continued to demonstrate its commitment to maintaining its stature as one of the nation’s premier conferences by welcoming the University of Missouri as the league’s 14th member, Commissioner Mike Slive announced Monday.

Missouri joins Texas A&M University as the league’s two new institutions who will begin full membership on July 1, 2012. It is the first expansion of the SEC membership since Arkansas and South Carolina joined the conference in 1992.

Missouri was a charter member of the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association in 1907, which became the Big Six Conference in 1964, the Big Eight Conference in 1964 and the Big 12 Conference in 1996.

Geographically, it is a natural fit as the state of Missouri touches more states (Arkansas, Kentucky and Tennessee) that currently are home to an SEC institution than any other state that is not in the league’s previous 13-member footprint. Like the majority of the cities in the SEC, Columbia, Mo., is a college-centered town with a metropolitan population of 164,283, making it the fifth- largest city in the state of Missouri.

With an enrollment of 32,415, the University of Missouri boasts a strong academic resume, as it is one of only five universities nationwide with law, medicine, veterinary medicine and a research reactor on one campus. Six of Missouri’s sports teams last season led the Big 12 in graduation rate for their respective sports.

Culturally, Missouri is as well known for its barbecue, country music, history and rich tradition as the majority of the current states of the SEC.

Missouri is one of only 35 public U.S. universities invited to membership in the prestigious Association of American Universities (AAU). It will become the fourth SEC school that is part of the AAU, joining Florida, Texas A&M and Vanderbilt.

*******************

Monday’s announcement marks just the fourth time in the history of the conference that the SEC will expand its membership. In a landscape that has seemed ever-changing in recent years, the SEC has exemplified stability as 10 of its original 13 members remain.

The league began as a 13-team league until Sewanee’s departure from the conference in 1940. After Georgia Tech’s move to independent status in 1964, the league had 11 members before Tulane departed in 1966, leaving the SEC as a 10-team conference for more than two decades.

At the start of the decade of the 1990s, a similar shift in conference alignment allowed Arkansas and South Carolina to join the SEC. The benefits have been nothing short of outstanding.

Soon after joining the league, the Razorbacks claimed the 1994 NCAA Championship in men’s basketball and finished as the NCAA runner-up the following year. They made their first appearance in the SEC Championship football game in 1995, appearing again in 2002 and 2006.

The Arkansas women’s basketball team made its first-ever Final Four appearance in 1998 before winning the WNIT the next season. The level of track and field in the SEC was quickly raised with the addition of the Razorbacks. Arkansas’ men won cross country national titles in 1992, 1993, 1995, 1998, 1999 and 2000. Men’s NCAA Indoor Track and Field Championships came every year from 1993-2000 and again in 2003, 2005 and 2006. The men also claimed NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships from 1993-1999 and again in 2003.

South Carolina won the Women’s NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championship in 2002, becoming, at the time, just the second different SEC team to claim an NCAA Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Championship. The past two seasons have been magical ones for the Gamecocks, as they have captured back-to-back NCAA Championships in baseball and advanced to the SEC Championship game in football for the first time in the program’s history.

On September 25, 2011, Texas A&M was announced as the league’s 13th member, beginning with the 2012-13 academic year. *******************

Missouri took to the field for the first time in 1890, making it one of the first SEC institutions to begin playing football. Kentucky played a three-game schedule in 1881, but didn’t play again until a decade later. Vanderbilt also began its football program in 1890.

Don Faurot was one of the early founders of Missouri athletics, as he was a three-sport standout for the Tigers from 1922-24. He served the school as its football coach from 1935-56 and continued on as the athletics director until 1967. Faurot is known for the creation of the Split-T formation in 1941. The formation’s option play still today serves as the basis for many present-day schemes, including the Wishbone, Wingbone, Veer and I-Formation.

Faurot compiled a record of 101-79-10, making the school’s first modern-day bowl appearance in 1939 when it advanced to the Orange Bowl. Until 1994, the year prior to his death, Faurot was heavily involved in the annual Blue-Gray football game in Montgomery, Ala.

The Tigers rose to national prominence under head coach Dan Devine in the 1960s, when Devine’s winning percentage of .767 was the best in the nation during that decade. In 13 seasons at Missouri, Devine posted a record of 93-37-7 and eight players earned First-Team All-America honors. His 1960 Missouri squad finished with an 11-0 record and defeated Navy 21-14 in the Orange Bowl. The 1965 squad went 8-2-1 and defeated Florida in the Sugar Bowl. The Tigers won the Big Eight Conference in 1960 and 1969 under Devine.

Since 2007, the football Tigers have claimed three Big 12 North Championships. Under current head coach Gary Pinkel, Missouri posted a 12-2 record in 2007 and defeated Arkansas in the Cotton Bowl.

The Tigers began playing basketball in 1906 and enjoyed the greatest amount of success under legendary head coach Norm Stewart from 1967-99. In 32 years, Stewart led Missouri to 634 wins and 333 losses for a .656 winning percentage, the best in program history. Stewart’s teams won 20 or more games 17 times, including a school-record 29 wins during the 1988-89 season. He won eight Big Eight Conference championships and six conference tournament titles.

Missouri started competing in the sport of baseball in 1891 and won the College World Series in 1954, marking the school’s first national title in any sport. The Tigers have made six CWS appearances in the program’s history, including three national runner-up finishes (1952, 1958, 1964).

The Tigers also have had great success in the sport of track and field and won the NCAA Men’s Indoor Championship in 1965. The soccer and softball teams have been proficient as of late with soccer winning the 2009 Big 12 Championship and softball claiming that title in 2011.

 

Missouri: What You Need To Know

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – Missouri became the Southeastern Conference’s 14th member. To familiarize yourself with important facts related to the Tigers’ athletics tradition, here is a quick rundown of what you need to know about Missouri athletics.

Founded: 1839 Enrollment: 32,415 Nickname: Tigers Colors: Old Gold and Black Mascot: Truman The Tiger (a Bengal tiger named after former U.S. President Harry S. Truman)

Previous Conference Affiliations: Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1907-1928); Big Six Conference (1929-1964); Big Eight Conference (1964-1996); Big 12 Conference (1996-Present) – north division

Sponsored Sports:

Men: Baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, swimming and diving, track and field, wrestling Women: Basketball, cross country, golf, gymnastics, soccer, softball, swimming and diving, tennis, track and field, volleyball

National Championships:

o Baseball: 1954 o Men’s Indoor Track and Field: 1965

Traditions:

Truman The Tiger

The nickname “Tigers,” given to Mizzou’s athletic teams, traces its origin to the Civil War period. At that time, plundering guerilla bands habitually raided small towns, and Columbia people constantly feared an attack. Such organizations as temporary “home guards” and vigilance companies banded together to fight off any possible forays.

The town’s preparedness discouraged any guerilla activity and the protecting organization began to disband in 1854. However, it

was rumored that a guerilla band, led by the notorious Bill Anderson, intended to sack the town. Quickly organized was an armed guard of Columbia citizens, who built a blockhouse and fortified the old courthouse in the center of town. This company was called “The Missouri Tigers.”

The marauders never came. The reputation of the intrepid “Tigers” presumably traveled abroad, and Anderson’s gang detoured around Columbia.

Soon after Missouri’s first football team was organized in 1890, the athletic committee adopted the nickname “Tiger” in official recognition of those Civil War defenders.Their spirit is now embodied in the MU mascot – “Truman the Tiger.” The Tiger was named Truman in 1984 because of a contest held by the cheerleaders. Previously MU had two mascots, a male and a female, but neither had an identity.

This contest was held on campus, over a period of a few weeks, to develop a name for the Tiger mascot. The winner, a student, submitted the name Truman (after Missouri-bred President of the United States Harry S Truman). The name stuck and has been popular ever since.

In 1986, the Tiger mascot design caricature, image, material, and color was in need of an upgrade. Jack Lengyel, Dick Tamburo, and Joe Castiglione sought a way to improve the overall personality of our mascot, Truman.

A design was submitted to the manufacturer for production. (Some financial help was provided by local restuaranteur Dick Walls.) The new mascot made its first appearance at the Missouri-Utah State football game in 1986.

Courtesy of http://www.mutigers.com/trads/mascot-football-traditions.html (http://www.mutigers.com/trads/mascot-football-traditions.html) Official Mizzou Ring

Gaining in popularity, the Official Mizzou Ring is a symbol of accomplishment at the university. Upon completion of 60 hours of study, students are eligible to receive their rings in an annual ceremony.

Courtesy of http://www.mizzou.com/s/1002/index.aspx?sid=1002&gid=1&pgid=322 (http://www.mutigers.com/trads/mascot-football-traditions.html) Homecoming

The Homecoming tradition was started at Mizzou in 1911, when the MU football coach and Director of Athletics, Chester Brewer, invited alumni to “come home” to Columbia for the annual football game against the University of Kansas.

Mizzou still boasts the largest student-run Homecoming in the nation. The annual events include a parade, blood drive, talent competition, tailgate, and many more.

Courtesy of http://www.mizzou.com/s/1002/index.aspx?sid=1002&gid=1&pgid=322 (http://www.mizzou.com/s/1002/index.aspx?sid=1002&gid=1&pgid=322) The Columns

The traditional symbol of the University of Missouri is the row of six Ionic columns. The Columns once supported the portico of Academic Hall, the first building erected on campus. Academic Hall was built between 1840 and 1843 from plans drawn by A. Stephen Hills, designer of the Missouri State Capitol.

It consisted of a domed central section of three stories with two wings and housed both educational and administrative facilities. Brick for the building was fired on campus. Limestone for the Columns was obtained from the nearby Hinkson Creek Valley and was hauled to the building by ox-drawn carts.

On Jan. 9, 1892, Academic Hall was destroyed by fire and the Columns were all that remained. In August 1893 the Board of Curators voted to remove the Columns, considering them not only unsafe but unsightly. However, supporters of the Columns rallied to their defense, and after inspection showed the foundations were safe, the Board voted to retain them in December 1893. Now the Columns stand as a beloved part of MU’s campus.

Courtesy of http://www.missouri.edu/about/history/columns.php (http://www.missouri.edu/about/history/columns.php) Missouri Athletics Web site: www.mutigers.com (http://www.mutigers.com)

Notable University of Missouri Former Students (Non-Athletes)

• John Anderson, sports broadcaster • Skip Caray, sports broadcaster • Sheryl Crow, musician • Dennis Dodd, sports journalist

• Pat Forde, sports journalist • Jim Lehrer, broadcaster • Lisa Myers, news broadcaster • Brad Pitt, actor • Richard Richards, Astronaut • Mort Walker, cartoonist • Sam Walton, Wal Mart • Tennessee Williams, playwright

What Is The State of Missouri Known For?

• State Nickname: Show-Me State • Known as “The Gateway to the West” • Birthplace of U.S. President Harry S. Truman (Independence, Mo.) • Winston Churchill’s “Iron Curtain Speech” (Fulton, Mo.) • Mark Twain’s Boyhood Home (Hannibal, Mo.) • Eastern Starting Point of Pony Express (St. Joseph, Mo.) • Crossroads of Country Music (Springfield, Mo./Branson, Mo.) • Barbecue (Kansas City, Mo.)

 

Homecoming Tradition Traced To MU

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – One aspect of Southeastern Conference athletics that fans at each of its member institutions take great pride in are the unique and long-lasting traditions that the schools have maintained for more than a century.

Missouri, which on Monday became the SEC’s 14th member effective July 1, 2012, is thought to be the creator of one of the greatest traditions in college football and one that is extremely prevalent on campuses across the SEC footprint.

Legend has it that the tradition of Homecoming games got its start at the University of Missouri in 1911. Chester Brewer, Missouri’s Director of Athletics at the time, wanted to add some additional fanfare surrounding the Tigers’ game with Kansas that year because it was being played on a college campus for the first time in its series history.

He reached out to the school’s alumni and former football players with the charge of “Coming Home” for the game. A then-record crowd of 9,000 fans were on hand for the game, which ended in a tie.

Though the University of Illinois was thought to have staged a similar celebration in 1910, Missouri was the first to hold a homecoming football game.

Entering the 2011 season, the Tigers held a 57-37-5 all-time record in homecoming games.

 

Missouri-SEC Connections: A History

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – The move to the Southeastern Conference indicates a new beginning for Missouri athletics, but the Tigers have a proud tradition and numerous ties with the SEC. Here’s a quick look at some of the most recognizable ties between the league and its new member.

Coaches

Mike Anderson, Men’s Basketball

Anderson spent 17 seasons as a volunteer assistant, recruiting coordinator and assistant head coach at Arkansas, during which time the Razorbacks made 16 Sweet 16 appearances, three Final Fours and the 1994 NCAA Championship. Following four seasons as the head coach at UAB, Anderson spent the last five years as the head coach at Missouri, leading the Tigers to an overall record of 111-56 (.665) with four NCAA Tournament victories and a 75-13 home record. After taking Missouri to the NCAA Elite Eight in 2009, Anderson was named the National Association of Basketball Coaches National Coach of the Year. He was named Arkansas’ head coach on March 23, 2011.

Frank Broyles, Football

Broyles served as Missouri’s head coach during the 1957 season, leading the Tigers to a 5-4-1 overall record before Dan Devine took over in 1958. Broyles had been a three-sport standout at Georgia Tech from 1944-46 when the Yellow Jackets were a member of the SEC. In 1958, Broyles took over a struggling Razorback program. During Broyles’ 19 seasons at Arkansas, he compiled a record of 144-58-5, leading his squad to seven Southwest Conference Championships and 10 bowl games. His 1964 Arkansas team won its 11 regular-season games and was voted national champions by the Football Writers Association of America, defeating Nebraska in the Cotton Bowl. Broyles served as Arkansas athletics director until 2007, leading the Razorbacks through their transition to the SEC in 1992.

John Cohen, Baseball

Cohen played baseball at Mississippi State from 1988-90, helping to lead the Bulldogs to the 1990 College World Series as a senior. Cohen’s first coaching job came as a graduate assistant and later assistant coach at Missouri from 1992-97. Under Cohen’s direction, the Missouri offense broke 17 total offensive records during his six seasons in Columbia. After four years as head coach at Northwestern State, Cohen spent two seasons as an assistant at Florida. He was then the head coach at the University of Kentucky for five seasons, beginning in 2003, compiling a 175-113-1 record and an SEC Championship. Since 2009, he has been head coach at Mississippi State.

Ernie Nestor, Men’s Basketball

Nestor is in his first season as an assistant basketball coach at Missouri, but has SEC ties, having served as an assistant coach on Dave Odom’s staff at South Carolina from 2001-2003. In 2001-02, the Gamecocks finished 22-15 and were the NIT runners-up.

Woody Widenhofer, Football

Widenhofer played linebacker at Missouri from 1961-64 and later served as Missouri’s head coach from 1985-88, compiling a 12-31-1 overall record. His best season came in 1987, leading the Tigers to a 5-6 overall record. Following NFL coaching stints at the Detroit Lions and Cleveland Browns, Widenhofer became Vanderbilt’s defensive coordinator in 1995. He was elevated to head coach in 1997, where he compiled a record of 15-37 in five seasons at the helm of the Commodores.

Big Football Games vs. SEC Opponents

2008 – Missouri 38, Arkansas 7

A Big-12 Conference Championship game loss away from reaching the BCS Championship game, Missouri recorded a dominating 38-7 Cotton Bowl victory against Arkansas. Mizzou was ranked No. 1 after beating Kansas in the regular-season finale but then lost badly to Oklahoma in the Big 12 title game. Arkansas wore all-red uniforms as a tribute to Frank Broyles, in his last game as the school’s athletics director.

2005 – Missouri 38, South Carolina 31

With Missouri trailing 21-0 after the first quarter and 28-14 at halftime, South Carolina outgained the Tigers 312 yards to 174 in the first half and held the football almost 11 minutes longer. But the Missouri outscored the Gamecocks 24-3 in the final period to claim a 38-31 Independence Bowl Victory. Missouri quarterback Brad Smith completed 21 of 37 passes for 282 yards, with one touchdown and an interception. He also ran for 150 yards and three touchdowns on 21 carries.

1978 – Alabama 38, Missouri 20

Playing in front of what was then the largest crowd in Memorial Stadium history (73,655), No. 1 Alabama pulled off a 38-20 victory against No. 11 Missouri. The Tigers were riding high after a win against Notre Dame, the defending national champion, the previous week. Missouri led 20-17 at halftime, but Alabama stormed out of the locker room at intermission. The Crimson Tide would go on to win their 10th national championship that year.

1973 – Missouri 34, Auburn 17

Missouri jumped out to a 28-10 advantage and rolled to a 34-17 victory against Auburn in the Sun Bowl. Missouri had a pair of players eclipse the 100-yard rushing plateau as Ray Bybee rushed 27 times for 127 yards and a touchdown, and Tommy Reamon rushed 23 times for 110 yards.

1968 – Missouri 35, Alabama 10

Employing the newly-installed Power-I formation, Missouri quarterback Terry McMillan ran for three touchdowns to lead the Tigers to a 35-10 Gator Bowl victory against Alabama. It marked Alabama’s worst bowl loss in the program’s history. McMillan didn’t complete a single pass in the game and he was picked off twice, but his three rushing touchdowns and new-look offensive formation kept the Crimson Tide off balance.

1966 – Missouri 20, Florida 18

With Florida trailing 20-0, junior quarterback Steve Spurrier brought the Gators’ offense to life in the fourth quarter, but it wasn’t enough in a 20-18 loss to Missouri in the Sugar Bowl. Spurrier completed 27-of-45 passes for 352 yards and became the first player from the losing team to be named the game’s Most Outstanding Player. He broke six bowl records in the contest.

1960 – Georgia 14, Missouri 0

In Georgia coach Wally Butts’ last game, senior quarterback Fran Tarkenton threw for two touchdowns and completed nine of 16 passes for 131 yards to lead the Bulldogs to a 14-0 Orange Bowl victory. Missouri, the Big Seven Conference Champions, threw three interceptions on potential scoring drives.

1958 – Vanderbilt 12, Missouri 8

Dan Devine, making his debut as Missouri’s head coach and its third coach in three years, would go on to become one of the most successful coaches in program history. But in his opener with the Tigers, Devine lost a 12-8 decision to Vanderbilt. He would lost just 37 more times in 13 years.

SEC-Missouri Football Series Histories

Alabama: Missouri Leads 2-1 (Last Meeting: 1978) Arkansas: Missouri leads 3-2 (Last Meeting: 2008) Auburn: Missouri Leads 1-0 (Last Meeting: 1973) Florida: Missouri Leads 1-0 (Last Meeting: 1966) Georgia: Missouri Trails 0-1 (Last Meeting: 1960) Kentucky: Missouri Trails 1-2 (Last Meeting: 1968) LSU: Missouri Leads 1-0 (Last Meeting: 1978)

Ole Miss: Missouri Leads 5-1 (Last Meeting: 2007) Mississippi State: Missouri Leads 2-0 (Last Meeting: 1984) South Carolina: Missouri Leads 2-0 (Last Meeting: 2005) Tennessee: Never Met Vanderbilt: Missouri Leads 2-1-1 (Last Meeting: 1958) Missouri All-Time vs. the SEC: 20-8-1

SEC-Missouri Men’s Basketball Series Histories

Alabama: Missouri Trails 1-4 (Last Meeting: 2001) Arkansas: Missouri Trails 18-19 (Last Meeting: 2007) Auburn: Never Met Florida: Never Met

Georgia: Missouri Leads 3-0 (Last Meeting: 2009) Kentucky: Missouri Trails 0-4 (Last Meeting: 1999) LSU: Missouri Trails 0-1 (Last Meeting: 1980) Ole Miss: Never Met

Mississippi State: Missouri Leads 2-1 (Last Meeting: 2007) South Carolina: Never Met Tennessee: Missouri Leads 4-2 (Last Meeting: 1985) Vanderbilt: Tigers Trail 2-3 (Last Meeting: 2010)

Missouri All-Time vs. the SEC: 30-34

 

Missouri To The SEC: The Dortch Report

Ernie Nestor, Men’s Basketball

Nestor is in his first season as an assistant basketball coach at Missouri, but has SEC ties, having served as an assistant coach on Dave Odom’s staff at South Carolina from 2001-2003. In 2001-02, the Gamecocks finished 22-15 and were the NIT runners-up.

Woody Widenhofer, Football

Widenhofer played linebacker at Missouri from 1961-64 and later served as Missouri’s head coach from 1985-88, compiling a 12-31-1 overall record. His best season came in 1987, leading the Tigers to a 5-6 overall record. Following NFL coaching stints at the Detroit Lions and Cleveland Browns, Widenhofer became Vanderbilt’s defensive coordinator in 1995. He was elevated to head coach in 1997, where he compiled a record of 15-37 in five seasons at the helm of the Commodores.

Big Football Games vs. SEC Opponents

2008 – Missouri 38, Arkansas 7

A Big-12 Conference Championship game loss away from reaching the BCS Championship game, Missouri recorded a dominating 38-7 Cotton Bowl victory against Arkansas. Mizzou was ranked No. 1 after beating Kansas in the regular-season finale but then lost badly to Oklahoma in the Big 12 title game. Arkansas wore all-red uniforms as a tribute to Frank Broyles, in his last game as the school’s athletics director.

2005 – Missouri 38, South Carolina 31

With Missouri trailing 21-0 after the first quarter and 28-14 at halftime, South Carolina outgained the Tigers 312 yards to 174 in the first half and held the football almost 11 minutes longer. But the Missouri outscored the Gamecocks 24-3 in the final period to claim a 38-31 Independence Bowl Victory. Missouri quarterback Brad Smith completed 21 of 37 passes for 282 yards, with one touchdown and an interception. He also ran for 150 yards and three touchdowns on 21 carries.

1978 – Alabama 38, Missouri 20

Playing in front of what was then the largest crowd in Memorial Stadium history (73,655), No. 1 Alabama pulled off a 38-20 victory against No. 11 Missouri. The Tigers were riding high after a win against Notre Dame, the defending national champion, the previous week. Missouri led 20-17 at halftime, but Alabama stormed out of the locker room at intermission. The Crimson Tide would go on to win their 10th national championship that year.

1973 – Missouri 34, Auburn 17

Missouri jumped out to a 28-10 advantage and rolled to a 34-17 victory against Auburn in the Sun Bowl. Missouri had a pair of players eclipse the 100-yard rushing plateau as Ray Bybee rushed 27 times for 127 yards and a touchdown, and Tommy Reamon rushed 23 times for 110 yards.

1968 – Missouri 35, Alabama 10

Employing the newly-installed Power-I formation, Missouri quarterback Terry McMillan ran for three touchdowns to lead the Tigers to a 35-10 Gator Bowl victory against Alabama. It marked Alabama’s worst bowl loss in the program’s history. McMillan didn’t complete a single pass in the game and he was picked off twice, but his three rushing touchdowns and new-look offensive formation kept the Crimson Tide off balance.

1966 – Missouri 20, Florida 18

With Florida trailing 20-0, junior quarterback Steve Spurrier brought the Gators’ offense to life in the fourth quarter, but it wasn’t enough in a 20-18 loss to Missouri in the Sugar Bowl. Spurrier completed 27-of-45 passes for 352 yards and became the first player from the losing team to be named the game’s Most Outstanding Player. He broke six bowl records in the contest.

1960 – Georgia 14, Missouri 0

In Georgia coach Wally Butts’ last game, senior quarterback Fran Tarkenton threw for two touchdowns and completed nine of 16 passes for 131 yards to lead the Bulldogs to a 14-0 Orange Bowl victory. Missouri, the Big Seven Conference Champions, threw three interceptions on potential scoring drives.

1958 – Vanderbilt 12, Missouri 8

Dan Devine, making his debut as Missouri’s head coach and its third coach in three years, would go on to become one of the most successful coaches in program history. But in his opener with the Tigers, Devine lost a 12-8 decision to Vanderbilt. He would lost just 37 more times in 13 years.

SEC-Missouri Football Series Histories

Alabama: Missouri Leads 2-1 (Last Meeting: 1978) Arkansas: Missouri leads 3-2 (Last Meeting: 2008) Auburn: Missouri Leads 1-0 (Last Meeting: 1973) Florida: Missouri Leads 1-0 (Last Meeting: 1966) Georgia: Missouri Trails 0-1 (Last Meeting: 1960) Kentucky: Missouri Trails 1-2 (Last Meeting: 1968) LSU: Missouri Leads 1-0 (Last Meeting: 1978)

Ole Miss: Missouri Leads 5-1 (Last Meeting: 2007) Mississippi State: Missouri Leads 2-0 (Last Meeting: 1984) South Carolina: Missouri Leads 2-0 (Last Meeting: 2005) Tennessee: Never Met Vanderbilt: Missouri Leads 2-1-1 (Last Meeting: 1958) Missouri All-Time vs. the SEC: 20-8-1

SEC-Missouri Men’s Basketball Series Histories

Alabama: Missouri Trails 1-4 (Last Meeting: 2001) Arkansas: Missouri Trails 18-19 (Last Meeting: 2007) Auburn: Never Met Florida: Never Met

Georgia: Missouri Leads 3-0 (Last Meeting: 2009) Kentucky: Missouri Trails 0-4 (Last Meeting: 1999) LSU: Missouri Trails 0-1 (Last Meeting: 1980) Ole Miss: Never Met

Mississippi State: Missouri Leads 2-1 (Last Meeting: 2007) South Carolina: Never Met Tennessee: Missouri Leads 4-2 (Last Meeting: 1985) Vanderbilt: Tigers Trail 2-3 (Last Meeting: 2010)

Missouri All-Time vs. the SEC: 30-34

 

Missouri To The SEC: Barnhart’s Take

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – With Missouri joining the Southeastern Conference, we continue to get reaction from across the nation about the league’s 14th team.

In this special “Q&A,” we sat down with Tony Barnhart, one of the country’s most esteemed college football writers. Known as “Mr. College Football,” Barnhart writes for CBS Sports, and has a weekly column here on the SEC Digital Network.

SEC Digital Network: What is your opinion of Missouri joining the SEC and what do you know about them as a football program?

Tony Barnhart: “I think people have to remember that, as recently as 2007, Missouri was ranked No. 1 and in a position to play for the national championship. If they beat Oklahoma in the Big 12 Championship game, they were in a position to play for it all. Gary Pinkel has been as consistent of a coach as they’ve ever had. Missouri knows what good football looks like.

The thing that people keep asking: ‘Is Missouri a cultural fit?’ I don’t think there’s any question that they are. People forget that there were questions about South Carolina and Arkansas. South Carolina had always been in the ACC or an independent, and Arkansas had been a founding member of the Southwest Conference, as far west as they were. People wondered if they would be a cultural fit. Once you bring somebody into the SEC family, after 3-4 years from now, that question will never be raised. They become a part of that family by being invited.”

SEC Digital Network: What can you tell people about Columbia, Mo., and is it similar to any SEC towns?

Tony Barnhart: “Columbia, Mo., is a neat place. You fly into St. Louis for the most part and then drive over. People there get very excited. They have been a very, very consistent football program and all this stuff about them being mediocre in the SEC, I just don’t see that. They recruit all over. They have gone into Texas quite a bit and recruited Chase Daniel, for one. I think people will enjoy Missouri – it’s a neat campus and a neat University. They’re an AAU institution, they’re very strong academically and they have one of the best journalism schools in the country. Now we will have an argument about what is the best journalism school in the SEC – is it Missouri or Georgia?”

SEC Digital Network: How much sense does it make to now have 14 teams in the SEC and how does that help the issues that you may see with 13 teams, such as scheduling?

Tony Barnhart: “Could the conference make it as 13 schools for one year? Sure; the scheduling models are done. The Mid-American Conference has done it, so there are ways for it to be done. But it’s not easy; this simplifies it. I don’t know what the conference will decide to do. To me, the logical thing would be to take Missouri and put them in the east. It’s not that far from Lexington, Ky. If you put them in the East, have Texas A&M stay in the west, then you play the other six teams in your division and have one permanent crossover on the other side. You would make Missouri and Texas A&M the permanent crossover. To me, that is the least disruptive thing to do. No matter what, you want to maintain some of the better crossover games in the divisions.”

SEC Digital Network: How much do you think the addition of Missouri will help football recruiting within the SEC?

Tony Barnhart: “I think it always helps to bring new markets into recruiting. Texas A&M brings in the Texas market, this brings you St. Louis and Kansas City. There are a lot of really good football players in that market. That part of the world has always viewed itself as Big 8 or Big 12 territory. The SEC games are already on television there, so you take the SEC brand and the high school recruiters can go in there and open those doors. I think anytime you can expand your recruiting base, it helps.”

SEC Digital Network: There are those SEC fans who may not understand bringing Missouri into the SEC. Having witnessed the addition of Arkansas and South Carolina, how similar to you view that situation to the addition of Missouri?

Tony Barnhart: “I think it will be exactly the same. People couldn’t envision South Carolina in the SEC. They certainly couldn’t envision Arkansas in the SEC, because they did most of their recruiting in the state of Texas. It’s a combination of branding – once you get that SEC brand – and playing teams and developing rivalries. I don’t know how many times Arkansas and Alabama played before Arkansas joined the SEC, but all of a sudden, you look up and it’s an honest to goodness football rivalry. It’s the mere fact of playing the games and having fans go to new places. In three or four years, this discussion will disappear. Whether or not Missouri is a cultural fit, it will evolve simply by bringing them into the family. It’s like when you bring in someone new to your family. The first two to three times at the dinner table are probably a little awkward, but after that everybody becomes comfortable.”

 


2 comments
Willie!T
Willie!T

Florida is less of a "cultural" fit than Mizzou. Ditto Vandy. One could even argue that LSU is less of a "cultural" fit if one had a mind to.

Mizzou brings great academics, solid athletics, new recruiting territory, and top 35 (I think) TV markets. As an accountant, I see a university that strengthens the brand, brings new money, and opportunities for more new money.

Welcome Tigers & Tiger fans everywhere!

Roll Tide!

GeoffDawg
GeoffDawg

Looking forward to reading this for real sometime soon.

On a side note, current Georgia Sr. tight end Aron White and former backup QB Logan Gray both hailed from Columbia, MO so the talent pool in recruiting is not all one-sided.

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